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Posted by on Mar 11, 2016 | 2 comments

Dive Into Code – Part 3 of 3

Super Breakout for the Atari 2600 with the Atari Paddle Controller

Photo: Leonard Paul

This article is a guest contribution by Leonard Paul, president of the School of Video Game Audio. He has worked on over twenty AAA and indie games such as ‘Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2,’ ‘NHL11,’ ‘Vessel’ and ‘Retro City Rampage’ as a technical sound designer and composer, and he has also composed for documentaries like ‘The Corporation’ and the upcoming ‘Beep: A Documentary History of Game Sound.’ You can visit his School of Video Game Audio website or can follow him at @SchoolGameAudio.

 

In the previous two installments, we looked at how C++ code works by triggering simple events in FMOD Studio for Mac. In this final installment, we’ll look at how you can add FMOD Studio to a clone of the classic video game ‘Breakout’ using Xcode on OS X. If you’re on Windows and looking for a similar tutorial, feel free to leave a comment and if there is enough interest I’ll add a bonus installment in the future. Also, feel free to download the source code and the FMOD Studio project as well as the completed application, if you just feel like playing around.

Since we want to work with games, it would be nice to test our coding skills on an actual game instead of use the basic code from the previous parts. Unfortunately, we can’t add our FMOD Studio code to just any game, since they aren’t often open source. Another issue is that games are quite complex, which makes it very difficult to correctly combine all of the elements together without any issues. I’ve opted to utilize SDL2 (Simple DirectMedia Layer 2), a free open source engine, which has been used on commercial titles including Team Fortress 2, Left for Dead 2 and DOTA 2. One advantage is that it allows us to run the code relatively unchanged on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, iOS and Android, which are all supported by FMOD Studio as well. If you use the SDL2 audio system instead of FMOD Studio, then you can also compile to JavaScript using Emscripten and run on nearly any system with JavaScript support.

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Posted by on Feb 23, 2016 | 0 comments

Designing Sound GDC Game Audio Crawl

EVENT POSTER

 

*** UPDATES ***

03.11.16: With over 260 RSVPs we’ve had to change the venue to not one, but four awesome bars / cafes, all within two blocks on Market Street. DS contributing editor Richard Gould will be at Brewcade from shortly before 4:00pm to hand out stickers which will signifiy you’re part of this event so you’ll know who and who not to randomly strike up a conversation with! Once you have a sticker, pick the venue that best fits your personality.

Brewcade (Retro Game Bar): 2200 Market St

Blackbird (Rustic-Modern Bar): 2124 Market St

Lucky 13 (Rock / Punk Bar): 2140 Market St

Café Flore (Relaxed Cafe, Food): 2298 Market St

 


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Posted by on Feb 9, 2016 | 0 comments

News: Sounds of Star Wars Battlefront Part 1

Stormtrooper is thrown by the blast of a massively destructive grenade called the Thermal Imploder

Photo: Star Wars™ Battlefront™ by EA DICE. Article by Adriane Kuzminski.

In Part 1 of this blog series, EA DICE invites you to hear from the sound designers of Star Wars: Battlefront as they break down the anatomy of their favorite sounds. Does the inhaling blast of a thermal imploder give you a Pringles complex, prompting you to lob them one after another until your lack of strategy causes others to wonder if Jar Jar Binks is on the battlefield? Sound Designer David Jegutidse breaks down the audio magic behind the creation of this weapon, sharing design techniques, influences and Soundcloud examples. Also, for those attending GDC next month with an Audio Track, Main Conference or All Access pass, don’t miss David Jegutidse and Composer Gordy Haab’s session on the music and sound design for Battlefront.

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Posted by on Feb 8, 2016 | 0 comments

News – Guild Wars 2: Heart of Thorns – Into the Sound

Recently, MMO news site Ten Ton Hammer caught up with the audio team at ArenaNet, developers of the Guild Wars franchise. In an in-depth overview of their recent work, sound designers Jerry Schroeder and Drew Cady shared some of their approaches, techniques, and experiences in creating the highly detailed sounds that fill the worlds of Guild Wars 2 and its expansion pack Heart of Thorns. Head here to check out this fantastic article, which also features a video interview with Schroeder and Cady (and quite a bit of Foley work!).

via Ten Ton Hammer

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Posted by on Jan 31, 2016 | 2 comments

Macros for Audio Production – Automating Your Workflow

This article was born out of an idea for a GDC audio talk proposal. Another one of my proposals was selected so I thought I’d turn the core idea of this one into a DS post in case it’s of use to the community.

Professor_Lucifer_Butts

used under creative commons, click for source

Do you use macros in your music/sound production? If the answer is yes, then this article isn’t for you. Given January’s theme is all about time management, I feel duty-bound to say you should make better use of your time and read one of the many other fantastic articles here on this site. If however, any of the following apply, read on!

  • “I don’t know what a macro is”
  • “Macros are just shortcuts right, like CMD C to copy?”
  • “Macros are only used by programmers.”
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