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Audio Branding in Coca-Cola Advertising

Posted by on Oct 18, 2015 | 5 comments


So last weekend I was on vacation in Atlanta with my recently proposed-to fiancee. In addition to going to a Ghost show, zoo, and the aquarium; we hit up the World of Coke.

The World of Coke museum is less of a museum and more of a huge advertisement for Coca-Cola beverages. From getting funneled in a short guided tour of memorabilia and then getting herded into a huge theater to watch a 7 minute commercial for Coca-Cola, the entire experience feels very much targeted at emotion, sentimentality, and and nostalgia.

The most interesting thing to me about the visit throughout the museum was the lack of actually seeing the brown liquid. Outside of a miniature working version of the Bottle Works, where you get to see them bottling Coca-Cola, you don’t *see* it.  However, you certainly hear it. (more…)

Thoughts on Limitations in Game Audio

Posted by on Oct 13, 2015 | 1 comment


Rob Bridgett is an audio director at Eidos-Montréal.

Leonard Paul is the president of the School of Video Game Audio.

Images courtesy of Rob Bridgett & Leonard Paul

Nine years ago, we collaborated on an article on the idea of limitations for Gamasutra and wanted to see where our thoughts would take us. This time around, rather than produce another article, this submission is a set of our musings meant to be used as starting points or inspiration when working with the limitations of game audio.

Allowing a view of the long-term in our art gives a certain freedom but it can also be paralyzing unless we set limits on ourselves.

An exciting, creative challenge is one with well defined limits: a well defined brief; a box to play in.

Not only do technical limits advance but also creative limits as well.

Working within a genre is a form of self-limitation (style and structure, for instance, “we’re going to write a 3 minute pop song”). A platform/format is a limitation: 12 inch, an LP (two sides), a CD (long running playlist). We need to consider the equivalent boxes and structures in games (menu, mission, genre, format, art style).


Interview with Rich Vreeland (Disasterpeace) on Restrictions

Posted by on Oct 12, 2015 | 0 comments

Earlier this month on a rare rainy Bay-Area day, I sat down with composer and musician Rich Vreeland (aka Disasterpeace) to discuss last month’s theme of “Restriction”. Rich is best known for his work in video games having composed music for “Fez”, “Bit.Trip Presents: Runner2”, “Gunhouse” and the forthcoming “Mini Metro” and “Hyper Light Drifter”. Most recently his score to the critically acclaimed motion picture “It Follows” received unanimous praise.

photo credit Nika States

Rich Vreeland (Disasterpeace) – photo credit Nika States



Review: Sonarworks Reference 3 & Measurement Microphone

Posted by on Oct 8, 2015 | 4 comments

Oh The Variables

When you consider the variables in play when dealing with audio, it amazes me that we’re able to create anything that sounds even half-decent to someone else.

Author-End Variables

  • How the authorship software processes audio
  • Digital-to-analog conversion quality
  • Unbalanced monitors / headphones
  • The acoustic space
  • Monitor placement
  • Mix position
  • Your ears
  • Your brain


Celebrating Dogme

Posted by on Oct 7, 2015 | 1 comment


When the topic of restriction first came up I immeadiately thought of the Dogme 95 movement. It seemed like such an obvious response that I spent some time hunting around for another topic. Inevitably though I’ve come back to Dogme. Partly because it really is a great example of working under restriction, but also because the films created within the movement are so striking in their subversion of the restrictions placed on them. This also gave me the opportunity to revisit two films I enjoy immensely, Festen (1998) and It’s All About Love (2003); both directed by Thomas Vinterberg and written by Vinterberg and Mogens Rukov. (more…)

New SFX Libraries September Recap

Posted by on Oct 5, 2015 | 0 comments

A live rooster perches in front of a microphone in a 1930s studio in Finland.

“A live rooster in the studio, 1930s.” by Yle Archives – Yle Arkisto. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Commons –,_1930s..jpg

This is the beginning of a new series to recapitulate each month’s SFX library releases. If you have a release occurring soon and you would like it to be included on our list, send us the details through our SFX Independence Submission form.


September brought us several SFX libraries with an overarching theme of darkness. Deep-water beasts, mysterious sci-fi ambiences, rumbling howitzers and stormy nights can be found on this list, so let’s take a look back at last month’s releases and explore the sounds you may now purchase for your future projects.

The Battlefield Howitzers by Airborne Sound
Every once in a while a sound effects library comes out and you know very well you have nothing like it in your audio arsenal. For some, The Battlefield Howitzers is that library. These authentic recordings of World War II-era ordnances contain the grace and ferocity of the M101 C1 and C3 howitzers and the British 25-pounder, along with 169 bonus clips of designed artillery shots and battlefield montage soundscapes.
(239 sounds, 4.89 GB) (more…)

Monthly Theme: Film Theory

Posted by on Oct 1, 2015 | 0 comments

Photo credit to: Nic McPhee

Photo credit to: Nic McPhee

From time to time, while working specifically on the audio portion of film projects (this is true for other mediums as well, though this month is focused on film), a sort of “tunnel vision” can occur and it is easy to overlook the importance of film as a complete artform and its impact on the world around us.

This month’s theme of Film Theory gives us all a chance to take a step back and review the purpose, power, and importance of film in our society. Also, this month serves as a great chance to reexamine and look deeper at what each of us sees as audio’s role(s) and importance within all genres of film.

We here at Designing Sound always encourage contributions from the community. If you would like to add your thoughts on Film Theory, please be in touch and let us know. As always, feel free to contribute to this month’s theme, or possibly next month’s topic is of more interest to you (which will be “Pure Sound Design”), or go completely off-topic. Anything is fair game. Please contact doron [@] this website and we will get the ball rolling.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Restrictions

Posted by on Oct 1, 2015 | 3 comments


Guest contribution by Matthew Marteinsson. Audio Director at Klei Entertainment.  Klei recently released Invisible Inc.

Restrictions. Usually it’s a bad thing. Something we fight against and
work around. I certainly look back at the restrictions of old consoles
with no fondness. But then you look at what The Beatles did with a 4
track (well a couple of 4 tracks and some bouncing) and you start to see
some magic in restrictions. These days with unlimited power in our tools
(relatively) putting some restrictions on ourselves can be a good way
to force yourself into some creative solutions.


The Inner Workings of Work

Posted by on Sep 22, 2015 | 6 comments


Image by flickr user Boston Public Library. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Image by flickr user Boston Public Library. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

In my relatively short career, I’ve been fortunate to work in a variety of roles within different frameworks (freelancer, startup, in-house and a contract employee). Whilst we sometimes hear people discussing what specific roles are like, we don’t often hear about these different frameworks and how they compare. I thought it might be interesting to share my observations on what pros and cons I found in each of these frameworks. So whether you’re a student looking for your first opportunities or a seasoned pro looking to transition roles, I hope some of these insights prove useful. (more…)

News: SOMA – Behind the Sound

Posted by on Sep 22, 2015 | 0 comments

There’s a common joke among game audio artists and designers: if you ask any number of sound designers what genre they’d most like to work on, the odds are good they’ll all say “horror”, twice. It’s no surprise it’s such a common answer, either; horror games offer designers some of the most interesting and diverse sound design opportunities one can come across. There’s no doubt that Frictional Games’s upcoming title SOMA fits this mold as well, evidenced by a fantastic blog post on Frictional’s website by the game’s audio director, Samuel Justice.

In the post, Sam discusses the approach he and the rest of the team took towards defining the distinct above- and underwater worlds of this eagerly-anticipated horror title. Sam goes into extensive detail on the techniques they used, both in the game’s engine and in content creation, to achieve a unique sonic identity for the game. Check out the post here, and also take a look at Sam’s other online home over at Sweet Justice, which features another great blog chock full of good info.