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Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 | 0 comments

JordanFehrFX JFFX-04 Interview with Jordan Fehr and Damian Kastbauer

jffx04-teaser-image

 

Jordan Fehr and Damian Kastbauer have put out a wonderful sound library together of Buttons, Gear, Equipment and Ambiences.  You may recognize Jordan from his work on such wonderful games as: Hotline Miami, Donkey Kong Country Returns, Super Meat Boy and Binding of Isaac.  Damian is no stranger to Designing Sound and to the online audio community.  He has worked as a Technical Sound Designer on fantastic titles such as: Uncharted 3, The Force Unleashed II, and Dead Space 3.

 

DS: Tell us a bit about the libraries and why you decided to record these specific subjects.

Jordan Fehr: I am often times called upon to work on projects with zero extra money for exploratory recording time like field recording or extensive Foley work, and so a lot of my recording is done during downtime to beef up my custom libraries for my own use. The libraries I have released so far under JFFX have been useful ingredients I knew anyone could use, or in the case of the restored industrial engines, a very unique source material that only a few people have access to. This new library began with me recording simply buttons and switches for UI  and Foley to use in my video game work, and I will not pretend it had nothing to do with purchasing a Schoeps-MK4 which is able to achieve a detailed high-end for these tiny sounds. As I started thinking more about the usage of the sounds I was recording, I decided to turn the library into a sort of Foley grab-bag of sounds that would accompany a situation with a lot of buttons and switches. Take a spy story for example: lots of gear and equipment with detailed foley to help suck you into the character’s busy work. A lot of the thinking was geared towards video game work once Damian approached me with his part of the library because I knew that the mono machines were perfect for 3D actors in modern game editors, but that is not to say that these sounds aren’t perfect for linear media work as well.

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Posted by on Dec 13, 2012 | 0 comments

Rewind…Audio Implementation Greats #3: Crackdown – Realtime Worlds

In the run-up to this month’s reverb theme, former contributor Damian Kastbauer suggested we re-run this article he put together discussing the game Crackdown for XBOX. The article may be two years old, but the content remains undeniably relevant. Never one to ignore good suggestions, here we are…

Crackdown

One area that has been gaining ground since the early days of EAX on the PC platform, and more recently it’s omnipresence in audio middleware toolsets, is Reverb. With the ability to enhance the sounds playing back in the game with reverberant information from the surrounding space, you can effectively communicate to the player a truer approximation of “being there” and help to further immerse them in the game world. While we often take Reverb for granted in our everyday life as something that helps us position ourselves in a space (the cavernous echo of an airport, the openness of a forest), it is something that is continually giving us feedback on our surroundings, and thus a critical part of the way we experience the world.

Continue Reading >>

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Posted by on Sep 5, 2012 | 1 comment

Wwise Project Adventure – Damian Kastbauer

I had the wonderful pleasure of throwing Damain Kastbauer some questions about the Wwise Project Adventure which is available with the latest version of Wwise ® – WaveWorks Interactive Sound Engine®  

Designing Sound: Tell me a bit about Wwise Project Adventure.  What is it?  What is it’s purpose?

Damain Kastbauer: “The Wwise Project Adventure – A Handbook for Creating Interactive Audio Using Wwise” is a guide to creating a complete project based on a fictitious game. The handbook frames many of the challenges generally faced in game audio and shows different ways to solve the problems through the Wwise authoring application. I also think it attempts to consolidate several different resources that Audiokinetic has made available over the years and bundle them into a comprehensive manual for people who are exploring the possibilities of game audio through Wwise.

The handbook and companion project will be available directly from the installer starting with today’s release of Wwise 2012.2. The included project includes working examples of the different techniques covered throughout the handbook utilizing content from Bay Area Sound. So many game audio fundamentals run throughout, I really feel that it is a great place to start for anyone interested in gaining a better understanding of the technical side of game sound.

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Posted by on May 1, 2012 | 0 comments

Racing Game Sound Study

A collection of blog posts, and a special edition of the Game Audio Podcast, have been coordinated by Damian Kastbauer and David Nichols on the dense subject of racing game audio. The remarkably in-depth studies (which feature video examples) rip apart audio techniques for the racing genre, investigating subjects such as tire squeals, surface types, camera perspectives, and of course, the sounds of the engines themselves.

From the Lost Chocolate Blog;

These informal game sound studies aim to expose the technical side of game audio by making an assessment of current generation titles. The assessment is then used as a way to better understand the differences in approach, aesthetics, and progression of techniques across a small sample. By turning the focus onto emerging details that arise during the course of the study we are able to identify area’s of significance and interest that help communicate the current state of the art. These finding are then represented in a content-rich report that includes: videos, article links, and specialized interviews. The goal is to help raise awareness for the technical side of sound design and help in the understanding of what is often not very well represented in current literature.

 

Check out the study in all it’s glory at the following links:

Vroom Vroom – A Study of Sound in Racing Games ( Introductory article in Game Developer Magazine )

TrackTime Audio blog – Racing Game Sound Study

Lost Chocolate Blog – Racing Game Sound Study

Game Audio Podcast – Racing Game Sound Study (with guests Mike Caviezel, Mike de Belle and Tim Bartlett)

 

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