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Posted by on Apr 28, 2014 | 1 comment

SoundMorph Release Intervention

SoundMorph celebrate their 1st anniversary with the announcement of their newest release Intervention.

Intervention is the most complete and researched SWAT sound effects library ever made, featuring 26 weapons recorded by Hollywood’s premier weapons recordist, Charles Maynes.

We’ve compiled a collection of the most frequently used weapons by American SWAT units, offering you a complete sound set to work on modern films, television or games.

We’ve even included the source recordings for you to design your own gunshots, and plenty of additional foley, utilities, boots, explosives, gun handling and gear body movements, making this the most developed soundpack library in its genre.

All files are 24bit/96khz stereo files, meticulously embedded with Soundminer & Basehead metadata, including:
26 weapons commonly used by US SWAT teams
Suppressed and burst variations for most weapons
Shot variations for dry, open exterior, interior and urban locations
4 source layers for each weapon, allowing you to design your own shots
14 gun foley weapon sets including reloads, magazine inserts and cocking
SWAT body gear movements
Utilities like night vision goggles, batons, battering rams and more
Large explosives and explosive sweeteners
Designed gun handling files for gun movements

Charles Maynes’ work includes Spider-Man, Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier and Resident Evil 5, and he is regarded as one of the go-to people in Hollywood and games for weapons recording.

Intervention also contains gun foley recorded by another Hollywood sound pro, Matthew E. Taylor.

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Posted by on Feb 24, 2014 | 3 comments

LA Underground – An Interview with Charles Maynes

LA-1-940I recently had a chance to sit down with sound designer and sound FX recordist Charles Maynes and chat about his new “LA Underground” sound library, available from Rabbit Ears Audio. Inspired by the gritty and seedy Los Angeles shown in countless films, “LA Underground” is a 10 GB collection of ambiences from all over the city, from the industrial centers near the LA River to the heart of Downtown.

Designing Sound: How did this library come about?

Charles Maynes: I had been talking to Zach Seivers and Justin Davey over at Snap Sound, who I had met through Dave Yewdall. Basically, a conversation I had with them last summer was kind of the seed for the conversation I eventually had with Michael [Raphael]. They had been hired to do a film in New York, and they were going to go out on location and record a bunch of stuff in the city and at the practical locations, and they were like, “Hey, this is a really big projects for us, so we’re going to actually invest in some Schoeps mics and stuff.” They were debating whether to go M/S or X/Y.

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Posted by on Dec 6, 2013 | 7 comments

Credit Where Credit is Due

Photo from Vancouver Film School flickr stream. Used under Creative Commons license.

Photo from Vancouver Film School flickr stream. Used under Creative Commons license.

Guest Contribution by Charles Maynes

With all the talk of what “is” or perhaps “isn’t” Sound Design, I think that largely we forget to recognize that ALL of the sound that is in a film, Television program, or interactive experience is “Sound Design”. Often times, we quickly forget the contributions of our dialog, and especially our music department in the way those sound groups fit into our end result. To claim a “reason” for that is somewhat self-evident- mainly that humans are a verbal creature in the manner of communication, and if we see a person moving their mouth, we usually have a need to hear some sort of communication come from it- even if its a baby crying, or an exhausted person panting after their exertions. Those sounds connect us to the story that the director and picture editor have laid before us (as well as the script writer). And it is a device to attach us to their narrative. Sound effects, of course have a similar sort of necessity as to making action we see onscreen be believable- whether it is someone walking across a space to giant robots destroying entire cities, we usually have an expectation to hear something that attaches a sort of aural reality to the depicted event.

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Posted by on Oct 22, 2013 | 0 comments

Charles Maynes on Mid-Side Recording

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Mid-Side recording mock-up using an AKG C414 and Schoeps MK6.

Sound designer and recordist Charles Maynes has written a great nuts-and-bols article about mid-side recording, posted on the field sepulchra blog a few days ago. The theory and practice of Mid-Side recording doesn’t get as much attention as its rockstar cousins, A-B and X-Y stereo configurations, which is odd because Mid-Side is an efficient, logical and just useful technique with which to capture sound.

Check out Charles Maynes’ excellent article here.

And if after reading it you’re wondering, like I was, PITA is: Pain. In. The. Ass.

http://sepulchra.com/blog/

Photo courtesy of the author

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