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Posted by on May 11, 2015 | 0 comments

Aotg.com: Audio Levels and Metering Pt. 1

As part of our continuing goal of promoting greater cross-discipline learning with media editing site Art of the Guillotine (Aotg.com), we’d like to bring your attention to their recent article Audio Levels and Metering: Pt. 1. While the article is largely focused at educating editors on good level and metering practices in non-linear editors, there’s some valuable information in the article, and it’s a great refresher on metering approaches even if you’re well versed on the subject. It also features a great side-by-side comparison video of four common meter types. Check it out here!

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Posted by on May 7, 2015 | 1 comment

SoundWorks Collection: The Sound of The Idealist

In a recent video, SoundWorks Collection speaks to Sound Designer (and Designing Sound Contributing Editor) Peter Albrechtsen and Sound Rerecording Mixer Lars Ginzel about their work on the Danish film “The Idealist”. In the video, they discuss their uniquely sonic approach to the film, which concerns a journalist who exposes the biggest political scandal in Danish history. They also discuss the film’s use of Dolby Atmos and the opportunities it afforded them.

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Posted by on Apr 24, 2015 | 0 comments

Creative Field Recording: “Visual Microphones” Create Missing Audio

In his newest blog post, Paul Virostek of Creative Field Recording examines an interesting question: If we’re able to recolorize black and white films, can we do the same with audio? The article discusses unique techniques and tools like visual microphones, which transcend regular audio restoration and offer the possibility of creating audio that would have been present in the original visuals. Check out the post here.

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Posted by on Aug 27, 2014 | 4 comments

Practical Exercises for Critical Listening

Exercising listening in a public outdoor space.

Exercising listening in a public outdoor space.

Sound designers by nature have an inherent curiosity towards sound. We explore the way sounds work every time we approach a project. With each new opportunity to design a sound, we ask ourselves questions such as: What object/event produced the sound(s)? Where is the sound source located in relation to the listener, and just as importantly, how does (or how will) the sound impact an audience’s emotional state when heard?

It goes without saying that the sheer act of producing our own sonic work, and by critically listening to and dissecting the works of others (as Berrak Nil Boya explored and extrapolated on in her recent post) will inherently make us stronger and better critical listeners. Though along with these practices, it is invaluable to also step away from evaluating completed, produced works and critically listen to some alternate sound sources, and in some potentially new ways; just like exercising a muscle, the more angles you can target your critical listening “muscle”, the stronger and more well-rounded it becomes.

The question then must be, other than by evaluating an already existing game or film’s audio as it was intended, how, and what, can we listen to in order to hone our listening abilities?

This post looks to add to this conversation by offering a few exercises I’ve picked up and augmented over the years and still use to this day. Once again, just like any exercise routine, training your critical listening is an on-going responsibility for any sound designer (though vitally important early in your career, continued practice is essential to maintain a high level of critical listening fitness).

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