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Posted by on Jul 1, 2016 | 0 comments

Monthly Theme: Tutorials

Learning via direct neural injection in the 1999 film The Matrix.

I think he likes it!

Want to be a sound designer? There’s lots to learn.

There always has been, really–but today it feels as though it’s happening all at once. Here’s a primer:

  • You’ve post-production: signal flow fundamentals, editing, library management and deliveries. There’s a host of DAWs to choose from, myriad ways of customizing them, and an ever-expanding selection of plug-ins, ensembles and techniques with which to craft the sound the piece deserves.
  • In games, you’ve some additional considerations with implementation, middleware, low-level integration, scripting and audio programming. Filenaming, workflow, best practices, systems design, post-mortems and analysis.
  • Ambisonics is back, as a means of orienting a soundfield around the immersive worlds of virtual reality–but also, in a new and growing selection of coincident capsule soundfield microphones capable of capturing four channels that decode into nearly anything you want from the experience you recorded.
  • Right, you’ll still need to get out in the field and capture sound once in a while–plus how best to clean, tag and ship it within the vast independent library scene that’s out there. Unless you’re leaning mostly on procedural sound design.
  • And at all stages, you shouldn’t forget your soft skills of client management, work-life balance and self-care. The basics of running a business.

Keen to get started?

As our community rises, as the barriers to content creation fall: we find ourselves awash in just as many ways to learn things as things to learn.

This month, Designing Sound focuses on Tutorials; that special messaging of lessons, that way in which we cope with just how damn much there is to know.

Who’s making them, and what on? How’d they start–where are they going next? How do you take that first step of acknowledging, “I have something I can teach”–and turn it into action?

If you’ve something to say or something you’d like to see, send us your thoughts, or post them below/to Facebook, or start up a conversation on Twitter!

Please email richard [at] this site to contribute an article for this month’s topic. And as always, please feel free to go “off-topic” if there’s something else you’re burning to share with the community.

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Posted by on Jun 30, 2016 | 1 comment

The Importance of 3D Audio for VR

This is a guest contribution by Chris Hegstrom. Chris started his audio career doing live sound for Blue Man Group while studying Music Synthesis at Berklee College of Music. He got into the games industry by way of web audio & shipped console titles like Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, Star Wars Ep. 3, Burnout Paradise & God of War 3.

In 2010 he joined Microsoft to direct audio for Kinect & then moved onto HoloLens soon after. Chris spent 3 years working on all aspects of HoloLens audio design & direction from individual experiences to sonic continuity to General audio UX.

Chris left Microsoft in 2015 & is now the owner & creative director of Symmetry Audio & co-founder of AudioVR.


 

Audio for VR is important, especially for audio people. For us it’s really important, but how important will it be to your everyday developer?

Before we dive into that, a quick back-story:

VR has been around in one form or another for decades, but computing power has only recently caught up to our dreams & allowed people (not at technology institutes) access to head mounted displays & experience fabricated worlds in stereoscopic 3D.

& now…the arms race.

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Posted by on Jun 1, 2016 | 1 comment

Monthly Theme: Pushing The Boundary

Photo by: monkeywing

Photo by: monkeywing

It is June.  When the renewing rains of spring turn to the unquenchable heat of summer. At least for some of us, anyway.

This month’s theme is Pushing The Boundary.

There are many boundaries that can be pushed. Creative, technical, social, and so on. What boundaries are you pushing?  Which do you wish would be pushed further than they have? Any that have been pushed too far?

Send us your thoughts, or post them below/to Facebook, or start up a conversation on Twitter!

 

Please email richard [at] this site to contribute an article for this month’s topic. And as always, please feel free to go “off-topic” if there’s something else you’re burning to share with the community.

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Posted by on May 30, 2016 | 0 comments

Sound Design: Affects on Physiological Performance

This piece is a guest contribution by Darrin P. Jolly. Darrin is a recent Valedictorian from the Bachelor of Science in Recording Arts program at Full Sail University. Currently completing a Masters of Science degree in Game Design, Darrin is conducting research on the applied influences audio has in saccadic time performance.

Darrin_Jolly-BW

Darrin Jolly

Abstract

This experiment was designed to measure the influence audio has on the saccadic response time of users viewing a two-dimensional plane. With potential applications for augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) platforms, it must be understood that neurophysiologic processes can be difficult to grasp, and designing studies to assess these can be complicated to construct.  This pilot test was conducted to see if primed audio impulses improve saccadic responses as opposed to no impulse. Once the data was coded and results analyzed, the significance was not only relevant but also quite intriguing.

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Posted by on May 1, 2016 | 0 comments

Monthly Theme: Research

research-390297_960_720

Re-search

noun
1. the systematic investigation into and study of materials and sources in order to establish facts and reach new conclusions.
“This month on DesigningSound.org we’re going to be looking into the subject of research”

verb
1. investigate systematically.
“What have you been researching? Would you like to share it with the community?”

The current state of audio technology is fascinating. A single person from home on a laptop can create their own DAW, plugins, use them to make music, mix a film, and author playable media. Physical modeling allows us to recreate believable sounding instruments from pure math. We can create convincing spacial audio in 3D game engines. We clean up audio removing extraneous noises with the precision of a surgeon who leaves no scars. We can capture the acoustic properties of a space, apply it to any sound, then remove the reverb we just added as if by magic. We can even morph and change the acoustic properties of a live environment in real-time. We can control sound with the press of a key, a slide on a touch-screen or a gesture in the air. But how did we get here, and where are we going?

For this month, DesigningSound is going to be looking at the subject of research and how it applies to audio. How does one conduct audio/sound research? What landmark studies contributed to where we are today in the audio-verse. What studies are currently being carried out and where might they take us?

Please email doron [at] this site to contribute an article for this month’s topic. And as always, please feel free to go “off-topic” if there’s something else you’re burning to share with the community.

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