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Posted by on Feb 25, 2014 | 7 comments

Whoosh Review

GUI3D_02In the last year, we’ve all been happy to see the slow emergence of software tools designed explicitly for sound design. The fine folks over at Tonsturm are the latest to release one such tool under the moniker Melted Sounds. Whoosh is a Reaktor based plug-in for designing, as implied by its name, complex and varied motion elements and pass-bys. The basic idea behind the tool is similar to a post here on Designing Sound by Charles Deenen, which was later built into a Kyma patch by Jean-Edouard Miclot. Whoosh simplifies the process of setting up this kind of processing chain yourself. If you’ve got Reaktor, you simply load the ensemble. The source material included with tool comes from some of the best independent sound effects libraries out there. Seriously, the list is hard to ignore. Sounds have been licensed from: Chuck Russom, Colin Hart, Tim Prebble, Jean-Edouard Miclot, Michael Raphael, Mikkel Nielsen, and Frank Bry…not to mention sounds from Tonsturm itself. It’s safe to assume that it sounds good…even if I weren’t about to tell you exactly that. Ultimately, deciding if it is a worthy addition to your toolbox is something we each have to decide individually. There are a lot of tools out there, and we all have our priorities. So, a review should be about its potential impact on workflow. Does it allow you a depth of control similar to Charles’ process at a comparable (or improved) speed?

Let’s take a look at what Whoosh can do.

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Posted by on Nov 25, 2013 | 10 comments

The Dialog Re-Assign Workflow

02_Complete Setup

My first exposure to noise reduction processing was with Waves X-Noise, working clip-by-clip, finding a snippet of noise in the clear, setting the noise profile, then processing the clip before moving to the next one. This offline processing method, while effective, would end up taking a lot of time, especially on long-form projects. Similarly, if you had a processed clip that needed its noise reduction altered, you would have to restore the un-processed version, find the noise print again, re-adjust the parameters, and then re-process it. When time is short (and when isn’t it?), real-time processes begin to look like a much better option. Unfortunately, plugins like X-Noise or iZotope RX Denoiser can’t be used effectively in real-time due to the enormous amounts of processing overhead required and the unmanageable latency added to the signal. With plugins like the new RX 3 Dialog Denoiser and Wave’s WNS and W43, real-time noise processing without expensive hardware is feasible, but it requires a change in workflow to utilize effectively. As I found once I started using the RX 3 Dialog Denoiser, putting one per dialog track was an inefficient use of CPU resources, and simply putting an instance on the main dialog bus proved problematic, especially when dealing with adjacent clips that had drastically different noise profiles.

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Posted by on Apr 30, 2013 | 3 comments

Pure Data Wavetable Synth – Part 9 (Fin)

Part09-01For those of you who just want to play around with the finished project, there is a download link at the bottom of the article. Despite all of this, I’m still relatively new at Pure Data and the Max language. To those who chime in with corrections or clarifications in the comments, you are most appreciated! If you’re new to PD, make sure you check the comments section for clarifying info provided by generous souls.

Last time, we implemented a three stage filter section with independent LFOs to sweep the center/cut-off frequency of each one. Today, we’ll finish up this patch by adding two last features…an anti-aliasing filter and the ability to record to the hard drive directly out of the patch. If you’re somehow just finding this series of tutorials, or you haven’t finished the previous steps, might I suggest you look those up here? This will also be the last time I’ll remind you to setup your MIDI controller in Pure Data before opening your patch. ;)

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Posted by on Apr 25, 2013 | 6 comments

Pure Data Wavetable Synth – Part 8

Part08-01aDespite all of this, I’m still relatively new at Pure Data and the Max language. To those who chime in with corrections or clarifications in the comments, you are most appreciated! If you’re new to PD, make sure you check the comments section for clarifying info provided by generous souls.

We’re picking up steam here. The synthesizer is essentially done. What we’re doing in the last two projects is adding features to make it a little more fun. Today, we’ll be adding in a 3 stage filter section. We’re going to route our synthesizer output through a hi-pass filter, then a band-pass filter, and finally a low-pass filter. It will pass through each of them in series, but we’ll be able to turn the filters on and off. Just to make things a little extra interesting, we’ll incorporate an LFO into each filter to sweep the center frequency (which we’ll also be able to turn on and off). You’ve completed the previous seven tutorials…right? ;)

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Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 | 2 comments

Pure Data Wavetable Synth – Part 7

Part07-01Despite all of this, I’m still relatively new at Pure Data and the Max language. To those who chime in with corrections or clarifications in the comments, you are most appreciated! If you’re new to PD, make sure you check the comments section for clarifying info provided by generous souls.

Today is “amplitude” day in our wavetable synthesizer series. We’re going to be implementing amplitude modulation, as well as a method to control the ADSR envelope of our individual voices. Do I need to say this next part again? Well, I will just in case. This is part 7 in this series of tutorials. Reading parts 1 through 6 before tackling today’s tasks is encouraged. As with the last two tutorials, make sure you connect your MIDI device and configure it in PD before opening your patch. MIDI input and control won’t work otherwise.

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