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Posted by on Aug 5, 2013 | 4 comments

inSPIRE, The Distance Music Experiment: Acoustic Explorations in Composition

Guest Contribution by Keith Lay

A special thank you to Keith Lay for this contribution which explores acoustics from the unique perspective of a musical composition and performance. Keith is a composer, producer, and educator based in Central Florida.

On October 20, 2012, musicians placed on rooftops, steeples, and lake boats in downtown Orlando, Florida performed “inSPIRE for 22 Brass, Carillons, C Bell and Distance” – the first experiment in “Distance Music”. The Orange County Arts & Cultural Affairs department supported the project as a part of National Arts and Humanities month.

Distance Music Concepts

As sound travels to a specific location, it is delayed by the distance in which it must travel to reach the target location or specific site. Distance Music accounts for these delays by having musicians farther from the audience play earlier, so as to make up for the time required for the sound to travel the distance.

A Distance Music piece is intended to be performed at a particular location, such that a listener cannot hear it correctly at any other place unless the distance, altitude, and terrain between the listener and music groups at that place are the same as those at the original environment. For example, inSPIRE cannot be performed in any other city than Orlando, or from any other rooftops, steeples, etc., than those for which I wrote it. Furthermore, the audience can only perceive the composer’s intentions in balance and counterpoint from a premeditated site (what is referred to as the “sweet spot” in this article).

A map of Downtown Orlando, the venue for inSPIRE.  This map indicates the musicians' locations within the city and each location's distance from the listening "sweet spot".

A map of Downtown Orlando, the venue for inSPIRE. This map indicates the musicians’ locations within the city and each location’s distance from the listening “sweet spot”.

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Posted by on Feb 1, 2013 | 0 comments

Thanks to our January Contributors

We’d like to thank our guest contributors for January’s plug-in features:

Thanks for making January fun! Today is the start of “Loudness” month, and we’ll be posting a run-down of what that means a little later today

Guest contributions are always welcome here. So, if you think you have something you’d like to share with the community contact shaun.at.designingsound.org.

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Posted by on Jan 24, 2013 | 2 comments

I Love Plug-ins!

Guest Contribution by Tom Todia

I love Plug-Ins!  There, I feel much better now. Since January is the month of the plug-in here at Designing Sound, I thought this was a great opportunity to share one of my new favorites with you.

This plug-in does exactly what its name states but it has a twist that I absolutely love. If you have not yet used it then allow me to introduce you to the “Frequency Shifter”. You will find this little gem as part of the AIR bundle standard with Pro Tools 8 and higher.

frequencyshifter

I swim in the dark and mysterious water that is game audio. This means that when I produce a sound effect I am often tasked with creating at least half a dozen variations of it. Why isn’t one sound variation enough you ask? Well if you have ever played a Sci-Fi style video game, then you know how often you are likely to hear the same laser gun being fired. Audible repetition is something we try our best to avoid, lest the illusion of the game world be broken. So in that design spirit, let me show you how easily you can create multiple variations of a laser gun with this plug-in without automating a single parameter.

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