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Posted by on Feb 7, 2016 | 1 comment

Sunday Sound Thought 6 – Feeling Sound

As the year continues, many of these posts will be philosophical in nature. Some will be in contradiction to previous postings. These are not intended as truths or assertions, they’re merely thoughts…ideas. Think of this as stream of consciousness over a wide span…

Picking up an element from last week’s thought… “sound is the result of a physical event.”

It’s the vibration of physical objects in response to a state change in other physical objects. It can’t move through the environment without those carrier objects…such as air (yes, I’m considering gas a physical object here). It exerts force on those objects, which can then exert force on other objects. It’s how we hear. Pressure waves in the air around us exert force on and displace our ear drums. Our brain converts the resulting signals to sound.

Maybe hearing is not it’s own separate and distinct sense, but instead a kind of specialized function of the sense of touch.  The sound in our environment “touches” us, our brain just interprets it differently than a hand on your arm.

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Posted by on Feb 4, 2016 | 0 comments

News – Cities and Memories: Dada Sounds

In another unique take on found sounds and field recording, Cities and Memory has put together a new project titled Dada Sounds to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the Dada avant-garde art music. Tomorrow marks a century after the 1916 founding of Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland, which was commonly held as the birthplace of Dada, an abstract art movement inspired by and protesting some of the causes of World War I. The Dada Sounds project takes field recordings from around the world and applies techniques and practices of Dadaism to generate new sonic creations. To hear the playlist and learn more about the project, take a look at the Dada Sounds project page.

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Posted by on Feb 2, 2016 | 0 comments

Monthly Theme: Audio Programming

Audio (music) programming by dabit.

This month at Designing Sound, we are focusing our lens on the concept of Audio Programming.

The above image is from David Padilla’s (AKA dabit) Banjo (here is the github link), which is a MIDI looper for live performance. He is a professional programmer (and an audio hobbyist) who’s work producing music within a programming language is quite impressive and academically intriguing. Though we do not all need to be professional programmers in order to be interested and involved in the process of audio programming. We, as sound designers, definitely have some additional tools and techniques to produce incredible and unique sound design through other (more user friendly) methods of programming as well.

Audio programming has always been a part of sound design in some form, though with the development of the more popular programs/languages such as Kyma, Max/MSP, and Pure Data (Pd), the world of audio programming continues to take an increasingly integral role in many of our workflows.

Whether you are a user of one or more of the above mentioned programming languages, a Csound expert, or are into another form of audio programming that is potentially less widely known or used. We would love to hear from you about your thoughts (and potentially tutorials) on how you use your favorite programming languages to produce your work.

Please email doron [at] this site to contribute an article for this month’s topic. And as always, please feel free to go “off-topic” as well.

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Posted by on Jan 31, 2016 | 0 comments

Sunday Sound Thought 5 – Unexpected Language

As the year continues, many of these posts will be philosophical in nature. Some will be in contradiction to previous postings. These are not intended as truths or assertions, they’re merely thoughts…ideas. Think of this as stream of consciousness over a wide span…

All sound communicates.

Sound is the result of a physical event. Whether it be the wind blowing through the trees, air passing over your vocal chords, or electrons traveling through a piece of metal to/from a transducer, there’s a physical event happening. Sound helps us register and comprehend that event. It doesn’t really matter if that event has any immediate meaning to us, sound is there for us to use. Our environment is always speaking to us.

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