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Posted by on Jun 24, 2016 | 0 comments

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 7

Photo: A man shows two other men how to operate a digital recorder and boom mic in Vietnam. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: Avosound

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this seventh installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from Pro Sound Effects, Mindful Audio, BLINKSONIC° and Collected Transients. Stay tuned for more stories from our community next week.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

Pro Sound Effects @prosoundeffects: My name is David Forshee. I’m the Library Specialist at Pro Sound Effects. Other key members of Team PSE include Douglas Price (Founder and President), Jeremy Siegel (Licensing Manager), and Andrew Emge (Operations Specialist).

Mindful Audio @theGeorgeVlad: I’m George Vlad, and I do audio for games and field recording.

BLINKSONIC° @blinksonic: I am Sylvain Stoppani (aka Ambor Grieko), founder of Blinksonic and the only member. With this project I create virtual instruments and sound banks for NI Reaktor.

Collected Transients @coltransients @stosh_t: My name is Stosh Tuszynski. Collected Transients consists of me and my microphones ;)

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Posted by on Jun 22, 2016 | 0 comments

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 6

A mic with a thick wind muff faces the propeller of a private jet.

Photo: Frank ‘The Recordist’ Bry

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this sixth installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from The Recordist, contortDistort, Sound Ex Machina, Pablo Valverde, and Avosound. Stay tuned for more stories from our community later this week and next week.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

The Recordist @the_recordist: My name is Frank Bry and I own and operate The Recordist.

contortDistort @contortDistort: Christian Kjeldsen, and I’m currently a solo operation.

Sound Ex Machina @soundexmachina: Hello there, thanks for having us! My name is Kostas Loukovikas and my co-creators are John Varelidis and Nick Zlatko.

Pablo Valverde @Valvertronix: My name is Pablo Valverde and I work alone, unless I need someone else.

Avosound @avosoundsfx: Guido Helbling.

When was a time you felt you pushed the boundaries to capture the perfect sound effect?

The Recordist: Back in 2009 I had a tendency to record in dangerous locations or perform risky actions to record sound effects. Whether it was crawling around a steep rock quarry cliff with a boom pole and a microphone, recording close up gigantic fire bursts, or setting off explosives, I tried to capture the “unique character” of the moment. I have since mellowed with my older age, but I still strive for that “once in a lifetime” sound event. I record lots of thunder and lightning and found that it’s hit and miss most of the time, but I have devised ways to effectively capture the wide dynamic range of thunderstorms. I had to build devices and create special locations to keep the recording gear safe while still capturing the raw power of thunder effectively.

Also, back then the Sennheiser 8000 series microphones were not widely used for recording sound effects. After a good friend sent me some sound effects he had recorded with the microphone, I was hooked. I was one of the very first vendors to release sounds using those microphones, and since then they have really caught on. Some wonderful material has been released by many people using this setup.

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Posted by on Jun 20, 2016 | 2 comments

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 5

A digital recorder is suspended off the ground in a makeshift bamboo tripod. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: Sebastian, Sonocaine http://www.sonocaine.com/blog/2015/6/16/robinson-crusoe-style-boom-wind-shield

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this fifth installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from Sonocaine, Foley Collection, Daan Hendricks and The Sound Pack Tree. Stay tuned for more stories from our community later this week and next week.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

Sonocaine @sonocaine: Hi, my Name is Sebastian Morsch and I run Sonocaine.

Foley Collection @foleycollection / Surround Sound LAB: My name is Alvaro de Iscar, founder and main sound designer of Foleycollection.com and Surroundsoundlab.net.

Daan Hendriks @AudioDaan: Daan Hendriks

The Sound Pack Tree @SoundPackTree: My name is Heiko Lohmann, and I work at the Hidden Track Studio in Cologne, Germany.

When was a time you felt you pushed the boundaries to capture the perfect sound effect?

Sonocaine: I’ve carried a lot of equipment to many places and record under different and sometimes hard conditions, but I’m not sure if that actually qualifies as “pushing the boundaries”. I’m not saying that doing these things to capture beautiful sounds is not a great and valuable effort, but if I am just working hard, I’m probably well inside those boundaries. When I recorded my last library ‘Quad City Berlin’, I carried five mic stands, five windshields and a 788 in a backpack around town on a bicycle (I really badly wanted spaced omni quad plus MS). It was physically challenging but I didn’t really push boundaries with doing so. It was just hard work. There are much greater stories in sound recording (i.e. clever worldizing setups, etc.) that constitute pushing boundaries, because they were actually thought up outside the box.

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Posted by on Jun 17, 2016 | 0 comments

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 4

Trees wind into the fog set high into the atmosphere. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: The Nature Sounds Society Japan – https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturesoundsjp/5823704520/in/photostream/

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this fourth installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from Detunized, BOOM Library, and Lilesoundlibrary. Stay tuned for more stories from our community through the next couple weeks.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

Detunized @detunized: Hello community! My name is Stephan Marche. In 2009 I founded Detunized where I develop and distribute themed sound libraries and live packs for the Ableton DAW, as well as universally formatted instrument banks. My current catalog offers about 80 releases. I don’t have employees or freelance supporters, so Detunized is a mere one-man business. Nevertheless I couldn’t run Detunized without the help of some alter egos. (Maybe it is funny to get to know the “team” ;-) )

BOOM Library @BOOMlibrary: My name is Axel Rohrbach from BOOM Library. My team members are Michael Schwendler, David Philipp and Patrice Börding.

Lilesoundlibrary @Lilesound: Hi, we are Carl and Francesco, co-founders of Lilesoundlibrary, an independent audio studio. In the beginning we dealt only with sound design and music for animated films and short movies. We realized that more and more we had to create and synchronize our own sounds to get the “perfect match” for our projects. So why not embark on the creation of libraries? It really is something we value with lots of fun and learning throughout the creative process.

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Posted by on Jun 13, 2016 | 1 comment

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 3

A pair of boom mics sit on a platform deep in the rainforests of Kamakura, Japan. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: Tim Prebble

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this third installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from HISS and a ROAR, Dynamic Interference, and Norsonant. Stay tuned for more stories from our community later this week and next week.

1. What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

HISS and a ROAR @timprebble: My name is Tim Prebble

Dynamic Interference @DynInterference: Shaun Farley, and it’s just me…unless you count my dog.

Norsonant @norsonant @thomasalf: My name is Thomas Alf Holmemo and I founded Norsonant. Marius Ytterdal joined the team when we started an audio post production company together in 2015. We also worked with Jory Prum who helped us record the ‘Shiba dog’ library before he passed away.

When was a time you felt you pushed the boundaries to capture the perfect sound effect? 

HISS and a ROAR: For me it occurs constantly, all of the time—it is a fundamental part of my nature and my ethos, my work: evolution, research and a constant motivation to explore unknown territory, whether it’s in the studio or out in the field. I love the feeling of travelling home after having captured unique new material and knowing that if it wasn’t for the fact that I had put myself in the path of that sound or image, it would not exist (other than ephemerally).

I fully acknowledge the giants on whose shoulders we all stand. For example, my exploration of contact mic recording might never have occurred without the incredible creative work done by Alan Splet and Anne Kroeber. In many ways their work was my starting point, but constant experimenting and exploring rapidly pushed me into uncharted territory.

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