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Posted by on Feb 10, 2014 | 7 comments

Capturing Personality in Animal Recordings

There’s something I’ve noticed about recording animals over the years. Even if the animal is being cooperative, it can be damned difficult to really catch an individual’s personality. If the animal is trained, that’s wonderful. You may be able to get a variety of sounds out of them with the handler’s help…BUT…vocalizations recorded from trained animals can often sound rote. They seem to get into the mentality of reacting to commands. You may get lucky and get some more interesting sounds between the performed ones, but take a step back and think about how situations affect YOUR behavior. Do you act differently when your boss is around? Your parents? Your significant other? Your best friend? When you’re by yourself? Your situation tends to define which sides of your personality come out.

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Posted by on Dec 17, 2013 | 5 comments

An Interview with John Roesch

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In  over 30 years working in sound, Foley artist John Roesch has amassed an impressive list of credits, including major films like “Inception” and “The Matrix” and games like “Final Fantasy X” and “Dead Space.” With over 400 credits to his name, John was awarded the MPSE’s Career Achievement Award earlier this year. I recently had the opportunity to sit down with John on his Foley stage on the Warner Brothers Studios lot in Burbank, California to talk about Foley, how he got into the business, and where he sees things moving forward.

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Posted by on Nov 22, 2013 | 0 comments

What Is ‘The Most Beautiful Sound In The World’?

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 BeautifulNow and The Sound Agency are accepting entries for the ‘The Most Beautiful Sound in the World’. Anything that encourages people to stop and think about the ecology of sound is a good thing in my book, which is one of the particular appeals of this competition. Simply record your sound, photograph it, and explain why you think it’s the most beautiful sound in the world, for your chance to win from a bunch of prizes including a Soundcloud Pro Membership.

Deadline for entries is December 16.

Competition details here.

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Posted by on Nov 4, 2013 | 0 comments

Hans Zimmer Percussion : HZ01 : Behind The Scenes

Spitfire Audio have released a YouTube Featurette for their upcoming Hans Zimmer Percussion library. Recorded at Air Studios via an unsurpassable signal chain. 96 rarefied microphones, into Neve Montserrat pre-amps, the world’s biggest Neve 88R desk (which was exhaustively re-gained at every dynamic layer for optimum signal quality), via a dual chain to HDX and Prism converters running at 192k. Over 30TB of raw data from these sessions alone.

The London Ensembles sessions feature the cream of Hans Zimmer’s hand picked percussion corps playing a distillation of a decade’s worth of musical experimentation and innovation. This is not an imitation of techniques explored in his numerous multi-billion dollar blockbuster back catalogue. It is a truthful recreation.

Each instrument has been mixed by a selection of long-serving Zimmer collabrators a selection of Grammy winning engineers for their own “take” on the Hans Zimmer experience, including Junkie XL, Geoff Foster, Alan Meyerson, Steve Lipson and Hans himself. Price TBC, Release date : November 2013.

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Posted by on Oct 28, 2013 | 5 comments

Happy Accidents: Embracing the Unexpected

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Allow me to share a story with you:

It was the weekend before the holiday break. Our horror film shoot had been going on for a few days, and as was typical of December at the base of Cape Cod, the weather was frigid and rapidly getting worse. With reports of an approaching winter storm, we frantically worked in the freezing cold to finish our exterior shots as quickly as possible. After moving inside the little house and getting the final shots of the day, my boom operator and I quieted everyone to perform the always-exciting task of collecting room tone.

Typically, room tone recordings are unremarkable things, but on this cold December night, hidden behind the whine of the set lighting, the creaks of an old settling house, the distant buzz of the electrical system, was a soft and rhythmic ringing. The two of us glanced around the room, making sure someone on the crew wasn’t fiddling with their keys, but even they had puzzled looks on their faces: They heard it, too. After a minute or so, we cut the recording and everyone started running around trying to find the source of the sound. It wasn’t until someone opened the front door that we realized what it was.

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