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Posted by on Mar 11, 2016 | 2 comments

Dive Into Code – Part 3 of 3

Super Breakout for the Atari 2600 with the Atari Paddle Controller

Photo: Leonard Paul

This article is a guest contribution by Leonard Paul, president of the School of Video Game Audio. He has worked on over twenty AAA and indie games such as ‘Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2,’ ‘NHL11,’ ‘Vessel’ and ‘Retro City Rampage’ as a technical sound designer and composer, and he has also composed for documentaries like ‘The Corporation’ and the upcoming ‘Beep: A Documentary History of Game Sound.’ You can visit his School of Video Game Audio website or can follow him at @SchoolGameAudio.

 

In the previous two installments, we looked at how C++ code works by triggering simple events in FMOD Studio for Mac. In this final installment, we’ll look at how you can add FMOD Studio to a clone of the classic video game ‘Breakout’ using Xcode on OS X. If you’re on Windows and looking for a similar tutorial, feel free to leave a comment and if there is enough interest I’ll add a bonus installment in the future. Also, feel free to download the source code and the FMOD Studio project as well as the completed application, if you just feel like playing around.

Since we want to work with games, it would be nice to test our coding skills on an actual game instead of use the basic code from the previous parts. Unfortunately, we can’t add our FMOD Studio code to just any game, since they aren’t often open source. Another issue is that games are quite complex, which makes it very difficult to correctly combine all of the elements together without any issues. I’ve opted to utilize SDL2 (Simple DirectMedia Layer 2), a free open source engine, which has been used on commercial titles including Team Fortress 2, Left for Dead 2 and DOTA 2. One advantage is that it allows us to run the code relatively unchanged on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, iOS and Android, which are all supported by FMOD Studio as well. If you use the SDL2 audio system instead of FMOD Studio, then you can also compile to JavaScript using Emscripten and run on nearly any system with JavaScript support.

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Posted by on Feb 12, 2016 | 0 comments

Dive Into Code! – Part 1 of 3

A vacant dock relaxes in the grand view of the Rainbow Park mountain range as a peaceful Alta Lake flickers below.

Photo: Leonard Paul

This article is a guest contribution by Leonard Paul, president of the School of Video Game Audio. He has worked on over twenty AAA and indie games such as ‘Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2,’ ‘NHL11,’ ‘Vessel’ and ‘Retro City Rampage’ as a technical sound designer and composer, and he has also composed for documentaries like ‘The Corporation’ and the upcoming ‘Beep: A Documentary History of Game Sound.’ You can visit his School of Video Game Audio website or can follow him at @SchoolGameAudio.

 

Ready for the plunge? Or maybe just a toe first? There has never been a better time to “dive” into audio coding, but instead of jumping in and hoping to swim right away, we’re just going to get our feet wet with this first article in the series.

This article is a gentle introduction to the fun world of game audio programming using C++ with FMOD Studio under OS X. You might be familiar with audio middleware implementation, or even complex effects chains and intricate modular synthesizer patches, but the thought of C++ code can still seem a bit daunting. It can be hard to figure out where to start with game audio coding, especially since the software and technology changes every few years. But just like learning a new language, even a few phrases can have amazing outcomes. C++ is currently the language used in many games, and the tools to learn how to code have never been more accessible. Each tool used in this article is entirely free to download and use, and with FMOD Studio being free for commercial indie releases, the skills you learn here can be used directly when working on games. It definitely isn’t necessary to know how to code when working in game audio, but it’s a lot more fun when you understand how a game plays back your sounds, and it can help you learn how to have more creative control. Now let’s get to it!

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Posted by on Mar 11, 2014 | 1 comment

FMOD Goes Indie Free

FMOD_Logo

FMOD Studio, one of the go-to tools for creating audio content in game environments, are making their tools completely free for independent game developers. The previous licensing structure was based largely on whether your use was commercial or not, but now Firelight Technologies – the company that makes FMOD – have announced its next generation audio content creation tools will now be free to all. Though no dollar amount was confirmed in the official press release, it is reported that only those titles with a budget in excess of $100K will have to pay.

FMOD Press Relase
fmod.org

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Posted by on Mar 5, 2013 | 1 comment

Sound Librarian Announces The Official FMOD Learning Suite

The wise and multitalented Stephan Schutze has announced a wonderful sounding suite of educational tools for the upcoming game audio middleware FMOD Studio. I can’t wait to see it for myself at GDC 2013. Press release below.

Sound Librarian                    For Immediate Release

Sound Librarian Announces

The Official FMOD Learning Suite

 

Melbourne, Australia-March 2013: Award winning audio production and educational provider Sound Librarian today announced the launch of The Official FMOD Learning Suite.

Developed in close association with Firelight Technologies, the developers of FMOD the world’s leading audio solution for interactive media, The FMOD Learning Suite is the first and only officially developed training program that includes certified course content specifically tailored to the games industry.

Brett Paterson the CEO of Firelight Technologies stated “We have long felt the need for certified training of our products to support the current generation of audio professionals and to inspire the future generations. As the developers of our training manuals and tutorial video series, Sound Librarian quite literally wrote the book on FMOD Studio and I can think of no better team to entrust this product to”

Sound Librarian has created a total solution package for educators that provides a broad range of training material and resources.

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Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 | 3 comments

FMOD Studio Video Tutorials Now Avaliable

While we still don’t know when FMOD Studio will come out of beta, we do know when some tutorial videos by Stephan Schutze will be available (right now).

YouTube Preview Image

Currently there are 4 new videos on the FMOD Video Channel which cover Interface Introduction (above), Project Setup, Multitrack Introduction and Mixer Introduction. FMOD Studio is a whole different beast than Designer so I would recommend getting a leg-up on these videos.

FMOD Studio is still in beta but can be downloaded here for Windows and OS X.

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