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Posted by on Apr 15, 2015 | 0 comments

Cities and Memory: Oblique Strategies

Cities and Memory: Oblique Strategies, a recent collaboration between sound artists, musicians, and field recordists from across the world, was released earlier today. The project brought these sound artists together to create new musical remixes of field recordings from around the world, using Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt’s Oblique Strategies cards as guideposts for their creations. It features recordings from locations across 19 countries, and involved 63 contributors, including Designing Sound’s own Berrak Nil Boya. Some of the pieces can be heard currently at the website, and an album of highlights will be released later this month on the Cities and Memory bandcamp.

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Posted by on Apr 14, 2015 | 0 comments

SoundWorks Collection: Lionel Train Recording

In a new entry in their podcast series, SoundWorks Collection speaks to Michael Raphael of Rabbit Ears Audio and Rudy Trubitt, Director of Audio for Lionel Trains. They discuss Rudy and Michaels experiences in sourcing new steam whistles for Lionel’s new products, exploring the challenges presented in recording the high-SPL steam whistles and the recording techniques they used,  as well as finding unique sounds to fit Lionel’s specific needs.

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Posted by on Apr 2, 2015 | 0 comments

Workflow and Creativity – A Journey Through Hot Sugar’s Cold World

Image hot-linked from the documentary’s website. Click on it to visit.

[ed. This article was originally intended to as part of our focus on women in March, but was delayed for a few reasons, but a good article is still a good article...enjoy!]

Guest Contribution by April Tucker

Thanks to everyone who took the time to comment, share, and reach out about my recent contribution, “Women in Audio: Yes, We Exist!” I was floored by the response, and hope we can continue an open dialog about what we can do to accept anyone who wants to work in our field.

Originally, I wasn’t going to write about being a woman in the industry, and I submitted the article below (which we decided to still share this month). While gender equality is a challenge, we all face challenges in our careers. Those challenges don’t just come from what we look like, where we live (or don’t live), age, race, or gender. In fact, sometimes those traits can be an advantage: Being unique or offering a different perspective can be a huge aid in creativity.

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Posted by on Feb 17, 2015 | 0 comments

Designing Sound Discussion Group – Scouts Honor

Image hot-linked from the Scout’s Honor website. Click the image to visit it.

UPDATE: We’re going to have to reschedule the talk due to some last minute scheduling conflicts. Date still to be determined, but we’ll keep you posted.

We had originally intended to schedule this talk back in November; during our focus on documentaries. Circumstances conspired against us, but a good idea is a good idea. So I’m happy to get this on our schedule this now. This coming Sunday (Feb 22nd), at 4PM U.S. Eastern time (1PM Pacific)Sometime soon, we’ll be hosting our next Designing Sound Discussion Group to talk about Scouts Honor: Inside a Marching Brotherhood. We’ll be speaking with one of the film’s directors, Mac Smith, and one of its co-producers, John “JT” Torrijos. Scouts Honor is a unique documentary in a couple of ways. First off, it’s follows the Madison Scouts, a drum and bugle corps out of Madison, Wisconsin, on their 2012 tour. The other thing that makes it unique is that this is the first film for both Smith and Torrijos in these roles…who both have day jobs at Skywalker Sound. We’ll be talking with Smith and Torrijos about the film, their experiences taking on a different role in film-making, and the methods used to sonically capture some spectacular recordings of live performances. [ed. I've heard them...in theater...and they are IMPRESSIVE!]

As usual, this will be hosted via Google Hangouts and will have time for Q&A at the end of the discussion. Come here this Sunday to watch the live-stream and to find the direct link to the Google Hangout so you can join the conversation. See you all on Sunday!

YouTube Preview Image

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Posted by on Feb 4, 2015 | 1 comment

The Japan Sound Effects Collection Interview

Screen Shot 2015-02-03 at 8.58.30 PM

At the time of writing, recent graduate and field recordist Chris Trevino has a Kickstarter campaign called “The Japan Sound Effect Collection” which he plans to be a collection of ambiences, train passes, and walla. Chris was kind enough to answer a few questions about his current campaign.

Designing Sound: Tell us a little bit about your own background in sound and field recording.

Chris Trevino: I was enraptured at a young age by the games that were coming out of Japan in the 90s. The music of Nobuo Uematsu (Final Fantasy Series) and Yasunori Mitsuda (Chrono Trigger/Cross) gave me both the game and Japan bugs. These games inspired me to take up the tenor saxophone and then later choir when I was younger and made me want to be a game composer.

I first started my undergraduate as an anthropology major, because of my love of cultures, but quickly discovered that I loved the ideas but was not passionate about the work.  At the end of my first year, still dreaming of game music, I took summer music composition classes and my first sound design class. Needless to say, I got hooked.

Since then, I’ve sound designed a handful of theater productions and have done a lot of field recording on my own. In the summers of 2012/13, I trained with Ric Viers at The Detroit Chop Shop.  While there, I helped record and edit four commercial sound effects libraries for BlastwaveFX. I started the Japan collection in Fall of 2013 while I was studying Japanese at a language center in Japan.

 

DS: What made you choose Japan as a subject for field recording?

CT: Choosing Japan as a subject for field recording was a natural choice given how much Japanese games influenced me when I was younger. When I was accepted into the language center in Japan, I knew that I needed to do as much recordings there as I could.

 

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