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Posted by on Feb 2, 2015 | 0 comments

Forget the 1s and 0s…

Photo by flickr user .tungl. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Photo by flickr user .tungl. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

We may be firmly in the digital age, but analog signals are always going to be a major part of our work. After all, unless you’re using a digital microphone using the AES42 spec, we’re at least going to be dealing with the signal path from the mic to preamp to AD…not to mention the reproduction path of DA to power amp to speaker. Analog will never truly go away, nor do people want it to. The resurgence of modular synthesis and the growth of vinyl sales are both evidence of that. We also still have techniques that we can apply to our digital workflow that were practically a necessity in the days of analog. [ed. …something I’ve posted about in the past.]

This month we’re turning our focus to analog to remind ourselves of how relevant the “older” technology still is, and the many ways people are still using it today.

As always, we encourage guest contributions here on Designing Sound. We’ve got something a little different planned for next month, which we’re keeping under wraps for now. April’s topic will be Comedy. If you have something you’d like to contribute to this month’s topic, April’s, or something off-topic…please don’t hesitate to reach out through our contact form or directly to shaun {at} this website.

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Posted by on Jan 5, 2015 | 0 comments

It Never Ends…

Photo by Matylda Czarnecka. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Photo by Matylda Czarnecka. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

First off, happy new year to all of our readers!

We’re going to kick this year off with a slightly different topic. We’re going to take a look at education. There will be some discussion of academic programs certainly, but that’s not necessarily the sum total of this topic. I know that personally, I’ve learned far more since finishing my “formal training” than I did during it. The courses I took certainly got me started and greatly affected the way I’ve approached my career, but it’s important to realize that your education never ends. Well, maybe it does, but it shouldn’t. Folks progress to the head of our field by shutting their brain down once they’ve got a piece of paper. The really good practitioners, and this is true in any field, continue to train, experiment and challenge themselves throughout their career.

So, what do you do to step up your game?

…and that’s not a rhetorical question. If you’re not new to the site, you probably already know that we always encourage and welcome guest contributions from the community. If you’re interested in adding to this month’s discussion, contact [shaun {at} this website].

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Posted by on Dec 7, 2014 | 6 comments

Designing Sound Discussion Group – Psychoacoustics for Sound Designers

You can watch today’s webinar here on Designing Sound, or…if you’d like to ask questions…you can join us over on Google Hangouts to participate more directly. If you’d like to ask some follow up questions, please reach out to us through our contact page, ping me on twitter or drop a comment below.

Additional media used during the presentation after the break.

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Posted by on Dec 1, 2014 | 1 comment

It’s All in Your Head…

Image from Flickr user Allan Ajifo, used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Image from Flickr user Allan Ajifo, used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Have you ever stopped to consider the fact that all of the sounds we hear in our life are actually the result of post-processing in our brains? That what you hear might not actually be what the person next to you hears? The combination and coordination of organs that goes into the interpretation of fluctuations in atmospheric pressure is truly a marvel. We’ve given ourselves a pretty hefty challenge this month; we’re going to be focusing on Psychoacoustics. It’s not an easy subject to approach from a sound designer’s perspective, but we’re going to attempt it anyways.

…and rather than put together a separate announcement post…

This coming Sunday (December 7th), at 3:30PM U.S. Eastern, I’ll be hosting a webinar version of my AES “Psychoacoustics for Sound Designers” presentation. So, mark it on your calendars, and come to the site to watch…or go directly to our Google+ page so you can interact and ask questions during the presentation.

Next month’s featured topic will be Education. As always, we encourage contributions from the community. If you would like to contribute to this or next month’s discussions, or have something off-topic that you would like to share with the community, contact shaun {at} this website.

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Posted by on Nov 3, 2014 | 3 comments

Documentaries

docCrew

Image by flickr user ryantxr, used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

When we start talking about sound design most people will automatically think about it in relation to action or sci-fi films; maybe horror or animation. Occasionally, you’ll find people talking about the use of sound in a drama…frequently in those cases, the idea of employing hyper reality. It’s a far more rare occasion to find people talking about the use of sound in documentary. The most common concerns with sound for docs is dialog intelligibility and noise reduction. Those are important, certainly, but the contributions that sound can make to a factual narrative can be profound. There’s also a lot of work going on in the doc community, and we’re going to try and shed some light on it this month.

Guest contributions from the community are a big part of what makes this site special, and we know a lot of you have some connection to this month’s topic. If you’d like to contribute to the discussion this month, or are interested in taking part in next month’s theme (psychoacoustics)…then contact [shaun {at} this website].

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