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Posted by on Feb 3, 2015 | 13 comments

A New Approach to Internships?

Maybe a little less preparing this... [Photo by flickr user chichacha. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.]

Maybe a little less time preparing this… [Photo by flickr user chichacha. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.]

Guest Contribution by Timothy Muirhead

Although we all like to talk about sound work as a very creative discipline it is also a technical one.  Universities and other post secondary institutions really have their hands full trying to teach both sides of the craft – the hows and the whys.  Most come up short on one side or the other and that is why the industry has come to rely so heavily on the concept of the internship to complete the educations of those just entering the work force. I know the work placement I did at the conclusion of my time in film school taught me more in 4 months then I was able to absorb in the previous three and a half years I spent in classrooms. The schools narrow it down to the individuals who are dedicated, and give them time to focus on the craft and decide if it is indeed right for them. It teaches perseverance – but the internship is where you really learn the trade.

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Posted by on Jan 30, 2015 | 0 comments

Deep or Shallow?

Image by Nick Page. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Image by Nick Page. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Guest Contribution by René Coronado

To a large degree, the purpose of learning is less to purely gain knowledge for the sake of it, and more to gain knowledge in order to use that knowledge to do something.

I propose that there are two basic types of learning: shallow and deep. Both types are useful, and both have positives and negatives.


Shallow learning is learning that comes by reading or watching instructions and following those instruction to the letter. Examples would include getting driving directions from your home to some place in town you haven’t been to yet, watching a youtube video on how to create a Skrillex styled wobble using Massive step by step, or building an IKEA bookshelf.

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Posted by on Jan 29, 2015 | 2 comments

Dynamics In Education – Interview With Michael Sweet, Professor of Game Audio at Berklee College of Music


Michael Sweet presenting at GDC

Michael Sweet presenting at GDC

As the Artistic Director of Video Game Scoring at Berklee College of Music, Michael Sweet leads the development of the game scoring curriculum.  Michael is an accomplished video game composer and has been the audio director of more than 100 award winning video games.  His work can be heard on the X-Box 360 logo and on award winning games from Cartoon Network, Sesame Workshop, PlayFirst, iWin, Gamelab, Shockwave, RealArcade, Pogo, Microsoft, Lego, AOL, and MTV, among others. He has won the Best Audio Award at the Independent Games Festival, the BDA Promax Gold Award for Best Sound Design, and has been nominated for four Game Audio Network Guild (GANG) awards. In 2014, Michael authored the book “Writing Interactive Music for Video Games” which is now available from Pearson Publishing.

Michael was a professor of mine during my studies at Berklee College of Music. Given this months’ theme of “education”, I thought it would be enlightening to hear Michael share his perspective as a professor of game audio with the Designing Sound community. So, without further ado…

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Posted by on Jan 26, 2015 | 1 comment

The Tonebenders on Education

The fine gentlemen over at The Tonebenders Podcast have once again graciously tied into this month’s theme. Their latest podcast, a conversation with Brenda Jaskulske of the University of North Texas, is now up for your listening pleasure in all of the usual places. I’m embedding the Soundcloud version below, but head over to their site to learn more about Brenda and how to access the podcast in your preferred format.

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Posted by on Jan 20, 2015 | 0 comments

Audio Education – A view from the middle

Clearly the fates have decreed that I should not only be involved in the writing of a new audio degree as education month comes around, but that I should also be well into my own studies, working towards a Master’s degree in Sound Design. However, in getting to this point, my own audio education has meandered along most of the routes one might take in the pursuit of a career in audio. I’ve volunteered at studios, received on the job (and in the pub) training. I’ve studied at private colleges and run my own studio. Each of these diversions had an intrinsic value and it’s unlikely I would be in the position I am now without having taken them. However, as both a lecturer and a student, I am acutely aware that there are mixed views as to the value of a formal audio education, not just from potential students, but also from employers and practitioners (i.e. this interview from a few weeks ago). So I thought it might be useful to talk a little about the nature of writing an audio degree, from the middle so to speak. (Just to note, I am based in the UK so this relates to the process’s undertaken here. I can’t speak for anywhere else.)

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