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Posted by on Nov 30, 2012 | 2 comments

Thanks to our November Contributors

We just wanted to take the time to thank our guest contributors this month:

For our featured Backgrounds and Ambiences articles…Chris Groegler, Chris Didlick, Douglas Murray, and Tim PrebbleYann Seznec, Peter Chilvers, Robert Thomas, and Stephan Schütze for discussing interactive mobile applications…and thanks to Chuck Michael and Craig Henighan for sharing their thoughts on Dolby Atmos (as well as Josh Gershman and John Loose from Dolby for providing us with a little more data). And a big thank you also goes out to Ariel Gross for sharing his thoughts, and Brady Dyck for his interview with Rob Bridgett.

Thanks again gentlemen!

Remember…this is a site for the community, by the community. If you would like to contribute in the future, drop us a line.

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Posted by on Nov 30, 2012 | 3 comments

Ambiences with Dolby Atmos

Sitting there as credits rolled after a Dolby Atmos presentation of Brave this past summer, I felt excited for the potential of this budding format. Before the film, a few seated moms and dads were even verbally excited as the usher announce that we would be watching the film in a new sound format. During the film, the theater was saturated with sound, I truly felt immersed at times.  Yet as I watched the credits fly by, I couldn’t help feeling that until sound crews sink their teeth into the format, we won’t really hear Atmos fully realized. For the format to really sparkle, films need to be designed, edited, and premixed with Atmos in mind or as Dolby would like it, premixed IN Atmos entirely. After reading about the impression Atmos left on Shaun at AES and trying to find a way to contribute to an already excellent month of ambient discussion, I decided I should contact a few sound crews that mixed in Atmos, ask how backgrounds are handled, and with that initial experience how they would approach BGs in their next Atmos mix.

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Posted by on Nov 30, 2012 | 5 comments

Dangerous Ambiences

Guest Contribution by Tim Prebble

I LOVE Ambiences!

I suspect growing up in a very quiet location on a farm in the South Island of New Zealand may have something to do with it, but I feel I have always been very aware of ambient sound. I have vivid sound memories from childhood, of ambiences! Waking up before the birds and waiting for them… The sound of the wind in blue gum trees and the sound from inside the shed when a bluegum nut fell off the tree and landed on the tin roof & rolled down… The sound of the Rangitata river when it was in flood and that time my dog swam out to an island & got stuck there for a while… what was he thinking?? Whether being sound obsessed is 100% normal I’m not sure, nor do I care, but when I first started working as a trainnee sound effects editor recording and editing ambiences was one of the first things I really relished. And decades later I still do. The contribution ambiences make to a film is so powerful, and yet they achieve their effect via the most understated duplicitous act: ideally an audience doesn’t notice them, but is deeply effected by them.

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Posted by on Nov 20, 2012 | 6 comments

Backgrounds: Sound Design Under the Radar

Guest article by Douglas Murray

photo by flickr user Bo47 (Bo Nielsen)

Remember, all rules are meant to be broken! With that principle in mind, let’s scratch the surface of the grammar and possibilities of an aspect of film sound design: backgrounds (also called BGs, atmospheres or ambiences).

Backgrounds offer a powerful opportunity to use sound for maximum impact. Movies essentially need to have background sound at all times. By adding background sounds to a scene we define what the scene is, where we are, and what’s happening around us, even off screen. We can also suggest to the audience how to feel emotionally about a particular scene by giving subtle or direct sonic cues incorporated into the background sounds.

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Posted by on Nov 19, 2012 | 0 comments

Building the World in Your Books

Guest contribution by Chris Didlick

We are Box of Toys Audio, a music and sound design company with studios in London and Stockholm. We provide audio services for commercials, branding, trailers and all manner of projects. With the ongoing innovation and expansion of digital media we are sometimes offered new and uncharted avenues for creativity, which is why when we were asked to work on the new Madefire Motion Book platform we embraced the challenge readily.

Madefire is an iOS app that has been optimised for the iPad and iPhone, emulating the traditional graphic novel format with the addition of motion, interactivity and audio. What’s more, Madefire is also releasing, in phases, free development tools that can be used by independent artists to create and publish their own stories on the platform. With Moving Brands CEO Ben Wolstenholme and comic book legends Dave Gibbons and Liam Sharp involved in the creation of the app, we jumped at the chance to create the audio for the first three in-house story releases, namely “Treatment”, “Captain Stone is Missing…” and “Mono”. Not only were we creating the audio for the narratives, we were also constructing an SFX library for use within the development tool. It was therefore important that the audio enhanced each story while being effective for future titles.

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