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Musarc presents Field Studies 2014: Cours De Poetique

Posted by on Mar 12, 2014 | 0 comments

FS2013_BrandonLabelle_2

Field Studies is a four-day masterclass led by acclaimed international artists and composers, complemented by a programme of workshops, evening lectures, screenings and performances. First taught in 2010 and originally conceived as a field-recording course exploring sound in the context of architecture and the city, Field Studies attracts students from many different backgrounds due to the course’s eccentric curriculum and the people who teach it.

Field Studies is organised by Musarc, a research and teaching programme led by Joseph Kohlmaier at The Cass Faculty of Art, Architecture and Design, London Metropolitan University. Musarc explores performance and composition in relation to the creative process; investigates listening in the context of architecture and the city; and has at its heart one of London’s most progressive amateur choirs.

14-17 April 2014
London

Featuring
Sam Auinger
Michael Klïen
Claudia Molitor
Akio Suzuki and Ak Onda
David Toop
Joseph Kohlmaier
Stefan Kraus
Melanie Pappenheim

An interview with Mark Roberts

Posted by on Mar 12, 2014 | 3 comments

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Mark Roberts has been a BBC natural history sound recordist for over 20 years. During that time he has explored some of the remotest parts of the planet. His career has taken him high into the Papua New Guinean rainforest canopy, deep underground inside Venezuelan mountains and even right into the heart of Indonesia’s volcanoes. He has been privileged to work with the world’s leading natural history film-makers and is the only member of the BBC’s team to have worked on every one of the nine Expeditions series, starting with Amazon Abyss in 2004. (more…)

Diego Stocco : FFS02 // Convolution Processing

Posted by on Mar 12, 2014 | 3 comments

Diego Stocco has released the second instalment of his Feedforward Sounds video series, each focussing on different experimental sound design techniques. For FFS02 it is Convolution Processing.

Convolution Processing is a technique that allows the real-time creation of musically related ambiences, accents and transition elements from an instrumental or vocal part. In this video you’ll see/hear how this technique can enrich a simple percussive part and a synth part into a full sounding track.

Screenings of the Documentary “Particle Fever” with Walter Murch

Posted by on Mar 11, 2014 | 0 comments

Are you in the San Francisco Bay Area this weekend? Then check out one of these screenings of Particle Fever, which will have a Q&A with director Mark Levinson and Editor WALTER MURCH!!!

Fri 3/14
Shattuck, Berkeley (Landmark Theaters)
7:30 show – intro and Q&A w/ director Mark Levinson and editor Walter Murch and physicists

Sat 3/15
Embarcadero, SF (Landmark Theaters)
7:30 show – intro and Q&A w/ director Mark Levinson and editor Walter Murch and physicists

Thanks to Kyrsten Mate for pointing this out!

FMOD Goes Indie Free

Posted by on Mar 11, 2014 | 1 comment

FMOD_Logo

FMOD Studio, one of the go-to tools for creating audio content in game environments, are making their tools completely free for independent game developers. The previous licensing structure was based largely on whether your use was commercial or not, but now Firelight Technologies – the company that makes FMOD – have announced its next generation audio content creation tools will now be free to all. Though no dollar amount was confirmed in the official press release, it is reported that only those titles with a budget in excess of $100K will have to pay.

FMOD Press Relase
fmod.org

The Sound Design of The Banner Saga

Posted by on Mar 10, 2014 | 9 comments

Guest Contribution by Michael Theiler of Kpow Audio

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We always knew The Banner Saga was going to be something special. First contact with the guys behind it was so positive and just easy. Our meetings and emails hit all the rights notes creatively so much so we just knew it was going to be an exhilarating ride. We weren’t wrong. Working on a project with such rich creativity and depth behind it, paired with the encouragement and trust the team showed, buoyed us, and heightened our commitment to the project.

There were a few key areas we concentrated on when it came to the sound design of The Banner Saga. We wanted to pay particular attention to the ambiences of the locations in the game – to make them real and evocative and never distract the player from the game. We wanted to make sure the banner, which is always with you but changes in length depending on how the player is progressing, had gravitas and importance without overwhelming the player. Likewise for the scenes where travelling by cart is depicted, the cart sounds were incredibly important as they were the sounds of the population traversing vast distances, fleeing from a dark force. We needed the fighting sounds to be gritty and real, and for their special abilities to have a different sound to them. We wanted the fighters to feel like they were pulling their strength and concentration for their actions from an internal well of ancient power. Finally we wanted the UI to not draw too much attention to itself, to feel solid and real but distinct from the other in-game sounds. (more…)

How About a Sound Ideaboard/Storyboard?

Posted by on Mar 7, 2014 | 15 comments

Storyboard

Photo by flickr user James Whatley. Used under Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Guest Contribution by Randy Thom

During pre-production on a film it’s common practice to gather lots and lots of still photographic images, and video as well, that might relate to the story. The stills are often displayed on walls for everyone preparing the film to see and talk about. It’s basically an “idea board.” The purpose of gathering these images is to stimulate thinking about the way the film should look, or about some other element of the story taking shape. Shots of potential locations for shooting, or locations evocative of those in the story, images of objects and props, shots of people similar to those in the story, animals, food, vehicles, landscapes, structures, etc. are compiled as concrete starting points of reference for constructing the look of the movie. Eventually a storyboard artist will draw images representing almost every shot in the film. It’s a way to help the filmmakers pre-visualize how each shot will be designed.

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Creating a Unified Voice

Posted by on Mar 6, 2014 | 6 comments

HandsIn

Image by flickr user woodleywonderworks. Used under Creative Commons license.

This article is not what I originally intended. I started it, nearly completed it and then decided to rewrite it from a different angle. It’s core subject remains intact, speaking to our collaborators…the people who hire us to make their pieces of media “sound good.” Whether we work in film, television, games, mobile applications, interactive art installations or any other existing or emerging medium, the majority of us work in service to another. Many a sound professional can be found lamenting the working situation they find themselves in; proclaiming, “ if only…”

(more…)

The Voice In…

Posted by on Mar 3, 2014 | 2 comments

VoiceInCinema

Michel Chion is a well known voice in film sound theory. A lot of people have heard of, and possibly read, his book Audio Vision. For some reason, The Voice in Cinema is a little less popular. This post isn’t really meant to be about Michel Chion or his books though. We’re focusing on the idea of “voice” this month, and it’s hard to come up with a header image that is relevant. ;)

I know some of you may be thinking, “Wait a minute. You just did “dialog” in January.” Well, we don’t consider “voice” and “dialog” to be interchangeable. Voice is something different, and more ethereal, than dialog. Dialog carries the raw data, and it’s the voice that gives it expression and emotion. The topic is far broader than simply “metadata for dialog” though; obviously, that’s not to say we are discouraging the discussion of characterization in sound design. That is a perfectly relevant idea for this month. There’s also the issue of defining the sonic voice of a piece, managing and melding the voice of many different artists on a project (directors, editors, sound designers, etc.), or the desire to give sound designers a voice that is equal in weight to the rest of our collaborators. The opportunities for discussion this month are many. So let’s get started!

As always, Designing Sound encourages guest contributions from the community. If you would like to contribute to this month’s theme, next month’s (“broken”) or touch on an important off-topic post, contact shaun [at] designingsound {dot} org, or use our contact form.