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DSDG – Noah With Craig Henighan and Coll Anderson

Posted by on May 11, 2014 | 0 comments

We’ll be starting our web chat with Craig and Coll in just a few minutes! Head over to our Google+ page if you want to ask questions when we get to the Q&A.

We had a great conversation, and the recording is now available, and remember that this and all of our other previous Designing Sound Discussion Group presentations are archived here.

Reflections in Your Control Room

Posted by on May 9, 2014 | 2 comments

Guest Contribution by Dennis Foley

The reflections in your control room represents the sound of your room. What sound do you ideally want from your control room? Do you want all the direct sound or straight line sound from your speakers? Do you want to include the sound of the reflections from the room in your mix? If so, how much of the room sound do you want?

Room sound is reflections. Reflections from your room walls, floor, ceiling, and rear wall are all part of the sound of the room. It is present in all rooms and must be managed correctly, if you are to hear all the sounds in your mix. Lets identify the problematic room boundary surfaces that produce these reflections.

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SFX Independence – May 2014

Posted by on May 8, 2014 | 2 comments

It’s been a little while since the last SFX Independence. This month’s round-up runs the gamut of sounds, from guns and rockets, to birds and screams. Plus, there are some get-them-while-you-can offers still on. First up…

Boom Library – Birds of Prey

boom library

With their latest release Boom Library continue their tradition of giving early-bird discounts (definitely no pun intended). They are offering a 20% discount on Birds of Prey up until May 10th of €119.20.

As an extra tidbit, check out this short interview with the sound designer Dennis Osternacher about recording in the wild.

www.boomlibrary.com

HISSandaROAR – Contact Mic Two

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HISSandaROAR released a new library this past week. Contact Mic Two is a whopping 12.5 GB of dual mono/stereo contact mic recordings, all recorded at 24-bit / 192KHz.

You can purchase either Contact Mic One or Contact Mic Two for a discount; $129 down from $198 for One, and $74 down from $99 for Two. This special offer ends midnight Friday 9 May though, so you’ve got to be quick.

Also worth checking out is the back story behind the latest release, as well as a beginner’s guide to contact mic recording, both courtesy of Tim Prebble’s The Music of Sound blog.

www.hissandaroar.com

Diego Stocco – FFS // Rhythmic Convolutions

Diego Stocco’s Feedforward Sound series has been a hit among professional and hobbyist sound design enthusiasts alike. The first tutorial, Rhythmic Processing, looked at generating rich rhythmic textures from one source recording with percussive transients. The second, Convolution Processing, shifted focus slightly toward creating and processing transients and accents that are musically in sync with a main rhythm track.

His latest offering is not a tutorial, but a collection of creatively recorded spaces. Rhythmic Convolutions takes impulse responses to another level, with a set of over 200 responses aimed designed for processing highly percussive sound elements.

At $29.99, this pack comes in a little pricier than the previous two, which is explained by the fact that these are impulse responses that once purchased can be integrated into any sound design workflow.

Audio files are 24-bit/48KHz.

EDIT: The standard price of $29.99 is specifically for the purchase of a music license single user. If your usage falls under any other category (or you’re not sure), you’re advised to check the product website and/or email ffs@diegostocco.com.

www.diegostocco.com

Rabbit Ears Audio – Rockets 2

Rockets 2 – Static Burns is the brand new library from Rabbit Ears Audio. Following on from Rockets 1, which pulled together a various rocket ignitions, launches and misfires, their new collection goes one step further.

Featuring an assortment of large-scale rocket motors, both dry propellant and commercially available, each motor was recorded from up to 8 perspectives at 24-bit / 192KHz.

Rockets 2 is currently priced at $79.00 (usual price $99.00) and, for a limited time, customers can pick up Rockets 1 and 2 for discounted price of $135.00 (usual price $169.00).

Visit the Rockets 2 product page for full details including licensing info.

Rabbit Ears Audio – Typewriters

RabbitEarsAudio
Another recent addition to the Rabbit Ears Audio library is Typewriters. Also priced at $70.00, this collection features seven different typewriters all recorded from 4 mono perspectives; close; distant; under keyboard (close) and; under type bars (close).

All files are recorded at 24-bit / 192KHz and are availble to purchase now via this link.

www.rabbitearsaudio.com

Watson Wu – FullAuto

FullAuto is a collection of two sound libraries (Part 1 and Part 2) from sound designer Watson Wu, featuring various recordings from full automatic rifles of different calibers. Recorded from a number of different perspectives, FullAuto also offers a range of shooting modes such as Singles, Bursts, Mag Dumps as well as gun foley sounds.

Each library is priced at $249.00 and is recorded at 24-bit / 96KHz.

http://www.watsonwu.com/store

Soundbits – Screams and Shouts

The final collection in this month’s round up is an impressive 873 screams, shouts, moans, grunts, hisses from humans, zombies, monsters and creatures from Saro Sahihi at Soundbits.

All recorded at 24-bit / 96KHz and priced at €40.00

Soundbits Store

The Dickson Experimental Sound Film

Posted by on May 7, 2014 | 0 comments

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Broken wax cylinder containing the ‘first’ film soundtrack circa 1894-1895

In ‘broken’ month I wanted to find out a little more about what’s being done to fix (and preserve) some of the broken pieces of film history. The story of the Dickson Experimental Sound Film (link to view at the end of the article) seemed to be a good way into the subject and I am indebted to Ken Weissman, supervisor of the film preservation lab at the Library of Congress, Jerry Fabris, museum curator at the Thomas Edison National Historical Park and Paul Spehr, author and film historian, for their help putting this article together. (more…)

Designing Sound Discussion Group – Noah and Atmos

Posted by on May 6, 2014 | 0 comments

Noah_CroweConnelly

We’re happy to announce that we’ve got another Designing Sound Discussion Group coming this Sunday! We’ll be hosting a live chat with Noah’s Craig Henighan and Coll Anderson. Given this month’s theme, we’ll be focusing in on a discussion of the impact of Dolby Atmos on their work for the film. Of course, we won’t be restricted to that, so make sure you come with your questions too!

The broadcast will be hosted through Google Hangouts on Air at 4PM, U.S. Eastern Time, this Sunday (May 11th). You can watch the live stream here on the site, but you’ll have to head over to our Google+ page if you want to ask questions/participate in the discussion.

Don’t forget that you can check out all of our previous Discussion Groups in our Archive, including our last web-panel with the audio post team for Orthodox: Remote Collaboration and Maintaining a Consistent Voice.

The World in Three Dimensions…

Posted by on May 2, 2014 | 5 comments

InsightScopeThere was a time when people argued that theatrical (even home) sound has long been three dimensional. Maybe there are still some that make that claim. With the rise of binaural audio, Dolby Atmos and Auro 3D, sound actually is entering the third dimension. This is just a small semantic argument. Surround sound, in its traditional 5.1 and 7.1 formats, wasn’t technically three dimensional. It was still a two dimensional plane, but that plane was perpendicular to the screen. In a way, it made the viewing experience three dimensional. Here we had the 2D screen on the vertical plane, and the 2D sound on the horizontal. The world of the film could extend away from the screen to envelop the viewer. As the presence of three dimensional image grows in our media consumption experiences, it’s become even more important to make good use of the surround technology at our disposal. The visual experience is now as immersive as the aural.

With that fact in mind, we turn our focus this month to the topic of “Surround.”

Next month’s featured topic will be “Silence.” As always, we want your guest contributions. If you have an idea you’d like to explore, or something you want to put in front of the community, whether it be as part of our monthly topic or something further afield, please contact us. Email Shaun, or use our contact form to get the ball rolling.

Don’t Panic and Carry A Towel: When Things Go Horribly, Horribly Wrong

Posted by on Apr 30, 2014 | 3 comments

Broken Monitor-1

As April comes to an end and we wrap up our topic for the month, “broken”, I wanted to take a moment and share something that I learned when I was first starting out, and something that I find myself having to remember quite often: how to react when everything starts to break.

We depend on a lot of complex technologies in our day-to-day lives, some more intricate and convoluted than others. As sound designers, we often find ourselves using even more complicated and specialized gear and equipment, adding to the complexity. While a lot of time and effort has gone into making these technologies work perfectly, the simple fact of the matter is that things have a tendency to break, often when you need them the most. As an old friend of mine likes to say, “Murphy was an optimist!” (more…)

Harvesting Anomalies

Posted by on Apr 29, 2014 | 4 comments

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Guest Contribution by Ivo Ivanov

Take a moment to think about the magnitude of all the rejected material that disappears during your editing process. Material with unwanted artifacts, discarded without much further thought, as it is rendered useless due to a number of auditory issues or location-specific problems. Now imagine if those discarded bits of audio were actually what you were truly looking for. Welcome to my world: I search for the sounds in between sounds.

While on a recent field recording trip with a few local colleagues, the day’s conversations and varying points of interest illuminated intriguing differences in our technical goals. While we all had essentially the same equipment (the usual field recorders, mics and accessories) and we were recording many of the same subjects, our focus and subsequent approach turned out to be significantly different. This raised some interesting discussions about perspective and context, which got me thinking about how much time I actually spend trying to deconstruct things and harness the “broken”.

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SoundMorph Release Intervention

Posted by on Apr 28, 2014 | 1 comment

SoundMorph celebrate their 1st anniversary with the announcement of their newest release Intervention.

Intervention is the most complete and researched SWAT sound effects library ever made, featuring 26 weapons recorded by Hollywood’s premier weapons recordist, Charles Maynes.

We’ve compiled a collection of the most frequently used weapons by American SWAT units, offering you a complete sound set to work on modern films, television or games.

We’ve even included the source recordings for you to design your own gunshots, and plenty of additional foley, utilities, boots, explosives, gun handling and gear body movements, making this the most developed soundpack library in its genre.

All files are 24bit/96khz stereo files, meticulously embedded with Soundminer & Basehead metadata, including:
26 weapons commonly used by US SWAT teams
Suppressed and burst variations for most weapons
Shot variations for dry, open exterior, interior and urban locations
4 source layers for each weapon, allowing you to design your own shots
14 gun foley weapon sets including reloads, magazine inserts and cocking
SWAT body gear movements
Utilities like night vision goggles, batons, battering rams and more
Large explosives and explosive sweeteners
Designed gun handling files for gun movements

Charles Maynes’ work includes Spider-Man, Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier and Resident Evil 5, and he is regarded as one of the go-to people in Hollywood and games for weapons recording.

Intervention also contains gun foley recorded by another Hollywood sound pro, Matthew E. Taylor.

The Tonebenders – Soundbytes: Circuit Bending

Posted by on Apr 28, 2014 | 0 comments

RothMobot
The fine gentlemen over at The Tonebenders Podcast have a new offering. “Soundbytes” are shorter, self contained, stories that they’ll be releasing in addition to the regular podcast. They saw our theme this month, and realized they had the perfect interview to go with it. So, give a listen to this interview about “circuit bending” with Moth Robot! [...and make sure you subscribe to their podcast, on the off chance you haven't already]