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Sound Design Podcast Roundup 2014

Posted by on May 21, 2014 | 2 comments

Photo cc: zoomar

Photo cc: zoomar

While Designing Sound is snuggled firmly in the warm and cozy blanket of text articles; it’s not always the most convenient way to absorb information. Whenever I am walking on a hiking trail or making a long (or even short!) drive I don’t usually listen to music unless I am out of new podcast episodes! People may be aware of the podcasts we have covered and collaborated with recently but I thought it would be cool to wrap them all up into a nice little bundle for everyone!

Here’s a roundup of the sound design podcasts that I listen to regularly: (more…)

Interview: Chris Sweetman and Interesting Interiors

Posted by on May 19, 2014 | 2 comments

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Chris Sweetman has a new library out called “Interesting Interiors” and was kind enough to be interviewed by Samuel Justice for this article.

For those who don’t know you – could you give a quick overview of your career?

I was very lucky to have an early start in sound. My father, Brian Sweetman, is a 50 year film sound veteran and I was brought up going to field recording sessions and fooling around in projection rooms as a kid, so when I left school it felt natural to move into sound.

Initially, I worked with my Dad who was running his own sound business working in the Film & Television industry back in the late 80′s/early 90′s. We worked mainly on film and tape stock (as DAW’s weren’t invented!) such as 16mm, 35mm, 1/4″ and Optical, I loved the tactile aspect of the job, playing around with splicers, moviolas and steenbecks. Most of the work we did was recording sounds, film transfers and voiceovers. That’s when I really started to get interested in making sounds. (more…)

Remembering Alan Splet

Posted by on May 15, 2014 | 4 comments

dunecinemat

One of the main reasons to start this site back in 2008 and also one of the things that keeps me motivated to do this is the impact that some people had in my life; curiously, people who I haven’t met in person, but I’ve deeply met with my ears.

I’m talking about those sound designers who created initial routes for all of us and started to develop a truly amazing way of working with sound, by establishing the essence of this art, not just from a technical perspective but an emotional, narrative and even spiritual one. I’m so glad to make this post about about one of those sound genius, a person that I know many of us deeply admire, Alan Splet.

He had the main faculties any sound designer needs to have, as described by Splet’s widow Ann Kroeber: “attention to detail, nuance, perseverance, ability to vastly influence the mood of a scene by the choice and placement of sounds”.  (more…)

In Search of a DIY Surround Panner

Posted by on May 15, 2014 | 9 comments

Photo by: Lu Chiganer

Photo by: Lu Chiganer

Last month my friend Marc Mailand was showing me around his home studio (which is super sweet). We were discussing his surround setup and mentioned needing a surround panner and how expensive they are. I noticed the PS3 controller sitting on his desk and wondered out loud: “There has got to be some sort of DIY solution using a game joystick as a surround panner”.  So when it came time to think up an article for this months topic of “Surround” I thought it would be eezy peezy to round up all of the DIY surround panners out there, only to find that it is a mythical beast! (more…)

Big Noise Go Boom: Bass Management and Your Subwoofer

Posted by on May 13, 2014 | 0 comments

 

That's a lot of bass

That’s a lot of bass

Let’s talk about surround sound systems for a quick second, shall we?

A modern surround sound system, in its simplest form, consists of six channels; Left, Center, Right, Left Surround, Right Surround, and the Low Frequency Effect channel. The first five channels are all fairly self-explanatory, denoting the location of the speaker itself and the channel’s location in the sound field. That last one, the LFE, is a little bit more complicated.  (more…)

DSDG – Noah With Craig Henighan and Coll Anderson

Posted by on May 11, 2014 | 0 comments

We’ll be starting our web chat with Craig and Coll in just a few minutes! Head over to our Google+ page if you want to ask questions when we get to the Q&A.

We had a great conversation, and the recording is now available, and remember that this and all of our other previous Designing Sound Discussion Group presentations are archived here.

Reflections in Your Control Room

Posted by on May 9, 2014 | 2 comments

Guest Contribution by Dennis Foley

The reflections in your control room represents the sound of your room. What sound do you ideally want from your control room? Do you want all the direct sound or straight line sound from your speakers? Do you want to include the sound of the reflections from the room in your mix? If so, how much of the room sound do you want?

Room sound is reflections. Reflections from your room walls, floor, ceiling, and rear wall are all part of the sound of the room. It is present in all rooms and must be managed correctly, if you are to hear all the sounds in your mix. Lets identify the problematic room boundary surfaces that produce these reflections.

(more…)

SFX Independence – May 2014

Posted by on May 8, 2014 | 2 comments

It’s been a little while since the last SFX Independence. This month’s round-up runs the gamut of sounds, from guns and rockets, to birds and screams. Plus, there are some get-them-while-you-can offers still on. First up…

Boom Library – Birds of Prey

boom library

With their latest release Boom Library continue their tradition of giving early-bird discounts (definitely no pun intended). They are offering a 20% discount on Birds of Prey up until May 10th of €119.20.

As an extra tidbit, check out this short interview with the sound designer Dennis Osternacher about recording in the wild.

www.boomlibrary.com

HISSandaROAR – Contact Mic Two

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HISSandaROAR released a new library this past week. Contact Mic Two is a whopping 12.5 GB of dual mono/stereo contact mic recordings, all recorded at 24-bit / 192KHz.

You can purchase either Contact Mic One or Contact Mic Two for a discount; $129 down from $198 for One, and $74 down from $99 for Two. This special offer ends midnight Friday 9 May though, so you’ve got to be quick.

Also worth checking out is the back story behind the latest release, as well as a beginner’s guide to contact mic recording, both courtesy of Tim Prebble’s The Music of Sound blog.

www.hissandaroar.com

Diego Stocco – FFS // Rhythmic Convolutions

Diego Stocco’s Feedforward Sound series has been a hit among professional and hobbyist sound design enthusiasts alike. The first tutorial, Rhythmic Processing, looked at generating rich rhythmic textures from one source recording with percussive transients. The second, Convolution Processing, shifted focus slightly toward creating and processing transients and accents that are musically in sync with a main rhythm track.

His latest offering is not a tutorial, but a collection of creatively recorded spaces. Rhythmic Convolutions takes impulse responses to another level, with a set of over 200 responses aimed designed for processing highly percussive sound elements.

At $29.99, this pack comes in a little pricier than the previous two, which is explained by the fact that these are impulse responses that once purchased can be integrated into any sound design workflow.

Audio files are 24-bit/48KHz.

EDIT: The standard price of $29.99 is specifically for the purchase of a music license single user. If your usage falls under any other category (or you’re not sure), you’re advised to check the product website and/or email ffs@diegostocco.com.

www.diegostocco.com

Rabbit Ears Audio – Rockets 2

Rockets 2 – Static Burns is the brand new library from Rabbit Ears Audio. Following on from Rockets 1, which pulled together a various rocket ignitions, launches and misfires, their new collection goes one step further.

Featuring an assortment of large-scale rocket motors, both dry propellant and commercially available, each motor was recorded from up to 8 perspectives at 24-bit / 192KHz.

Rockets 2 is currently priced at $79.00 (usual price $99.00) and, for a limited time, customers can pick up Rockets 1 and 2 for discounted price of $135.00 (usual price $169.00).

Visit the Rockets 2 product page for full details including licensing info.

Rabbit Ears Audio – Typewriters

RabbitEarsAudio
Another recent addition to the Rabbit Ears Audio library is Typewriters. Also priced at $70.00, this collection features seven different typewriters all recorded from 4 mono perspectives; close; distant; under keyboard (close) and; under type bars (close).

All files are recorded at 24-bit / 192KHz and are availble to purchase now via this link.

www.rabbitearsaudio.com

Watson Wu – FullAuto

FullAuto is a collection of two sound libraries (Part 1 and Part 2) from sound designer Watson Wu, featuring various recordings from full automatic rifles of different calibers. Recorded from a number of different perspectives, FullAuto also offers a range of shooting modes such as Singles, Bursts, Mag Dumps as well as gun foley sounds.

Each library is priced at $249.00 and is recorded at 24-bit / 96KHz.

http://www.watsonwu.com/store

Soundbits – Screams and Shouts

The final collection in this month’s round up is an impressive 873 screams, shouts, moans, grunts, hisses from humans, zombies, monsters and creatures from Saro Sahihi at Soundbits.

All recorded at 24-bit / 96KHz and priced at €40.00

Soundbits Store

The Dickson Experimental Sound Film

Posted by on May 7, 2014 | 0 comments

Dickson_Illust

Broken wax cylinder containing the ‘first’ film soundtrack circa 1894-1895

In ‘broken’ month I wanted to find out a little more about what’s being done to fix (and preserve) some of the broken pieces of film history. The story of the Dickson Experimental Sound Film (link to view at the end of the article) seemed to be a good way into the subject and I am indebted to Ken Weissman, supervisor of the film preservation lab at the Library of Congress, Jerry Fabris, museum curator at the Thomas Edison National Historical Park and Paul Spehr, author and film historian, for their help putting this article together. (more…)