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SFX Independence – November 2014

Posted by on Nov 11, 2014 | 0 comments

If you create independent sound effects libraries and would like us to consider your recently-released library for inclusion in a future roundup, use the SFX Independence Submission Form to tell us all about it.

Tovusound – India Ambience / CityBeeps Cologne

Tovusound have made available two ambience packs that will transport you to the heart of Europe and South Asia.

The India Ambience sample library contains the sounds of big cities, nature, people and vehicles. Featuring 178 sounds recorded in 96 kHZ / 24-bit ORTF Stereo, India Ambience should prove a welcome addition to sound editors, sound designers and audio producers needing to fill in backgrounds or transitions with sounds from the region.

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Invasive Insects and Immersive Sonics – Ren Klyce on the Sound of Gone Girl

Posted by on Nov 5, 2014 | 0 comments

GoneGirlposter

Director David Fincher and sound designer Ren Klyce has worked together for more than 20 years, and their ongoing partnership is one of most acclaimed collaborations in the modern film sound community. Klyce has been nominated for five Oscars – one for Fight Club, one for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, one for The Social Network and two for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

Their latest work is the very successful marital thriller Gone Girl which has just overtaken The Curious Case of Benjamin Button as director Fincher’s highest-grossing film in the US. The movie is filled with so many twists and turns that you can’t really talk about it without revealing something – and this interview with Ren Klyce also contains spoilers, beware!

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Documentaries

Posted by on Nov 3, 2014 | 3 comments

docCrew

Image by flickr user ryantxr, used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

When we start talking about sound design most people will automatically think about it in relation to action or sci-fi films; maybe horror or animation. Occasionally, you’ll find people talking about the use of sound in a drama…frequently in those cases, the idea of employing hyper reality. It’s a far more rare occasion to find people talking about the use of sound in documentary. The most common concerns with sound for docs is dialog intelligibility and noise reduction. Those are important, certainly, but the contributions that sound can make to a factual narrative can be profound. There’s also a lot of work going on in the doc community, and we’re going to try and shed some light on it this month.

Guest contributions from the community are a big part of what makes this site special, and we know a lot of you have some connection to this month’s topic. If you’d like to contribute to the discussion this month, or are interested in taking part in next month’s theme (psychoacoustics)…then contact [shaun {at} this website].

What’s The Deal With Procedural Game Audio?

Posted by on Oct 31, 2014 | 4 comments

Guest contribution by Martin Roth

We’ve all heard of the promises of procedural game audio. A veritable Valhalla where sounds are created out of thin air, driven by the game engine, eliminating the need for huge sample libraries and tedious recording. Sounds great! So why aren’t we hearing more of it in games today? We’ve all experienced Rockstar’s work in GTA 5; those bicycles sure do sound great! Some indy games such as Fract or Pugs luv Beats have dabbled. But it seems that if procedural audio were all that it promised, it would be much more common. What’s the deal?

The hard truth is that while the idea is great in theory, no one knows what they’re doing in practice. The field is lacking in design principles, tools, and technical performance. This is especially true considering the end-to-end workflow. On one end, high-level tools are needed to give designers the flexibility to explore sound and its interactions. On the other, low-level tools are needed to make those creations available where they’re needed, be that on the desktop, mobile, console, embedded systems, web, or anywhere else. The end-to-end workflow is key to the adoption of procedural audio.

For the purposes of this article the terms proceduralgenerative, and interactive as they relate to sound and composition will be used interchangeably. Their distinction is important, but we’ll leave that for another article.

Scarce Design Resources

The field suffers from a lack of resources to learn how to make procedural audio, including standards for judging its merits. Undoubtedly the best learning resource is Andy Farnell’s book Designing Sound. The presentation focuses on design from first principles, but may leave those without a technical background struggling to understand the reasoning (but don’t let that stop you from reading it!). The book is written for clarity, not for absolute performance or maximum sound quality. Resources are otherwise scattered, usually compensated for by personal interest or continued education specifically on the topic.

Tools, Well Almost

Undoubtedly there many excellent tools available to design sounds, especially musical ones. A near fifty year history of electronic music has created a wealth of knowledge, best-practices, and interfaces for exploring sound. But here the end-to-end argument is critical. Unless the designer can run the sounds on the target platform, the tools are not helpful except as a part of the creative process.

In order to satisfy this requirement, the available tools are generally limited to any number of audio programming languages (or even general purpose programming languages). There include Pure DataMax/MSPSuperColliderCsoundChuck, C/C++, the list goes on. Many of these have robust and knowledgable communities supporting them. All of these tools allow the user to “do stuff” with sound, but how well they meet the needs of sound designers is debatable. Many would say that the learning curve is far too steep. The target audience for these tools has typically been those more interested in experimental work.

This leaves us in the difficult situation where the ideal solution is fragmented between tools that satisfy the high-level design requirements and those that satisfy the low-level technical requirements.

Low-Level Really Is Low

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The Making Of Thunderstorm 3 SFX Library Part 2

Posted by on Oct 27, 2014 | 1 comment

Guest Contribution by Frank Bry

Check out part 1 of The Making of Thunderstorm 3 SFX here.

In this second and final article I will discuss microphone patterns, recording device pre amp settings, editing and the final mastering phase of this collection. Before I dive into all the technical mumbo jumbo I want to express that when I’m setting up and actually recording thunder and lightning I get quite excited. There must be something in the air, alien mind control beams or just the anticipation of getting the “ultimate” thunder clap or lightning strike. It’s very hard work and involves exercise, listening, tracking the storms and watching the skies. I feel like a kid in a candy shop and I feel the recording is the easy part. So, now we begin. Part 2: The Real Work Begins. (more…)

In Pursuit of Silence

Posted by on Oct 24, 2014 | 0 comments

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Early last year, we pointed out In Pursuit of Silence on Kickstarter. The initial campaign was early production funding. We then had the opportunity to interview the director, Patrick Shen, while he was in the middle of production and get a glimpse into the progress of the film. Now they’re at the point where they’re working to raise finishing funds. We support this film and its efforts to raise awareness about the pollution in our sonic environments, and we want to see it completed in a manner befitting the subject. I personally have backed it both times, so I’m not sitting here to encourage you to do so without taking part myself. If you missed the boat on the previous round of funding, now’s your chance to help support a doc which is focusing on a subject near and dear to the hearts of many in the community. Please help the film make it out into the world and have the impact it’s designed to. In the very least, please help spread the word!

Visit the Kickstarter page here

Synthesis Tips for the Non-Synthesist

Posted by on Oct 22, 2014 | 0 comments

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Guest Contribution from Steven Smith

Introduction

In some ways it seems quite strange to find myself authoring a post on synthesis that has as its main topic: “Not everyone needs to be a synthesist”. But from another angle of practicality, it makes a great deal of sense. Many of us already have found ourselves naturally diving into certain areas of synthesis from within the field and somewhat skating around others.  So…  If you are not a synthesis geek, this article is for you. 

‘Why would it be helpful to explore this area?’ you may be wondering. Even though today’s virtual instruments commonly ship with hundreds or even thousands of presets, many users will still find themselves passing over sounds that are not quite right. Yet with some fundamental knowledge and strategies I feel most non-synthesist could quickly address some of these sound’s shortcomings and reshape them close enough to quickly put them in service.

This is precisely my goal. I hope to address some fundamental strategies and principles relating to synthesis and synthesizers in order to facilitate what I like to think of as quick fixes. Even though these strategies will not work 100% of the time, you should find them coming to the rescue quite often. 

From the onset it will be my intention to populate this article with images from multiple synths. This is a small attempt to expose you to as many different views as possible. Given that each synth designer has its own GUI strategies (in addition to its own sound design strategies), I hope this will further help the usefulness of the material presented.

There is also a body of knowledge that we must have to enable us to find sounds, change them, and then Save these changes. Let’s jump in…

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Diego Stocco | Creative Miking Techniques

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 | 1 comment

Diego Stocco returns with the third in his video series of advanced & experimental sound design techniques Feedforward Sounds. In this tutorial entitled “Creative Miking Techniques” Stocco goes into great detail to explain some of his techniques developed for sound design through creative recording.

“From my point of view, even in these days where plugins, controllers and apps have become important tools for music production and sound design, being able to effectively and creatively use microphones remains essential, because creating original sounds from all kind of acoustic sources remains essential.”

“Deconstructing the Soundtrack” Master Class in London

Posted by on Oct 9, 2014 | 0 comments

The School of Sound (the folks behind The New Soundtrack academic journal and the School of Sound International Symposiums) and the London Film School are teaming up again to offer a 2 day Master Class on October 25th and 26th in London. The seminar will be conducted by Stephen Deutsch, Larry Sider and Annabelle Pangborn.

Experts Larry Sider, Annabelle Pangborn and Stephen Deutsch will each deliver a half-day seminar demonstrating the interrelationship between sound, music, image and story. The programme will include a discussion of strategies and concepts for working with sound and music, from pre- to post-production.

They have also offered Designing Sound readers a 10% discount through applying the code SoS10%designingsound. Head here for additional details and to register for the event. This discount code will also work for the upcoming “Practical Introduction to Location Sound: Recording and Mixing” and “Music Licensing in Film and TV” seminars.