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Posted by on Jan 30, 2015 | 0 comments

Deep or Shallow?

Image by Nick Page. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Image by Nick Page. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Guest Contribution by René Coronado

To a large degree, the purpose of learning is less to purely gain knowledge for the sake of it, and more to gain knowledge in order to use that knowledge to do something.

I propose that there are two basic types of learning: shallow and deep. Both types are useful, and both have positives and negatives.


 

Shallow learning is learning that comes by reading or watching instructions and following those instruction to the letter. Examples would include getting driving directions from your home to some place in town you haven’t been to yet, watching a youtube video on how to create a Skrillex styled wobble using Massive step by step, or building an IKEA bookshelf.

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Posted by on Jan 26, 2015 | 1 comment

The Tonebenders on Education

The fine gentlemen over at The Tonebenders Podcast have once again graciously tied into this month’s theme. Their latest podcast, a conversation with Brenda Jaskulske of the University of North Texas, is now up for your listening pleasure in all of the usual places. I’m embedding the Soundcloud version below, but head over to their site to learn more about Brenda and how to access the podcast in your preferred format.

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Posted by on Jan 16, 2015 | 1 comment

Gary Rydstrom’s Strange Magic

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Normally we wouldn’t make any fuss about a particular film’s release, but this is one’s a little special for our community. Gary Rydstrom has had several opportunities to sit down in the director’s chair for short films in the past, but this film, Strange Magic, is his first feature. We often talk about promoting the importance of sound as a story-telling tool, but here we have one of the most vocal and respected proponents of that idea with his hands on the reins. If you find yourself with the opportunity to see the film, I encourage you to show support and check it out. It opens in the U.S. next Friday, the 23rd.

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Posted by on Jan 14, 2015 | 7 comments

Life Lessons and Audio Education

Photo belongs to Vancouver Film School, used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Photo belongs to Vancouver Film School, used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Guest Contribution by April Tucker

Having a degree in audio can be a double-edged sword. This was a lesson I learned after one of my earliest interviews, not long after completing my Master’s Degree (in Sound Recording). I was new to Los Angeles and interviewing for part-time tech work. It seemed to be going well until the interviewer said, “I don’t even have friends with Master’s Degrees… why would I hire someone with one?” I had just been discriminated against for having a formal education.

There’s a lot of lessons about working in entertainment (like that one) that you hear about and prepare for, but you can’t really process until you experience it yourself. Another example is being out of work. Even if you’re financially prepared, nothing can prepare you for the mental game that happens when you’re going through it the first time.

Given that our field is very experience-driven, one might ask, what’s the point of formal audio education? As someone with two audio degrees (and ten years in the field), I can confidently say that there is value in some audio education; students can practice, experiment and fail in ways that you can’t do in a job. There’s skills that can be learned faster through focused learning or practice (like technical ear training, acoustics, or electronics). My concern with audio programs is that they tend to be too focused on teaching niche vocational skills (like large format consoles and microphones), or too short for a well-rounded audio education.

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Posted by on Jan 5, 2015 | 0 comments

It Never Ends…

Photo by Matylda Czarnecka. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Photo by Matylda Czarnecka. Used under a Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

First off, happy new year to all of our readers!

We’re going to kick this year off with a slightly different topic. We’re going to take a look at education. There will be some discussion of academic programs certainly, but that’s not necessarily the sum total of this topic. I know that personally, I’ve learned far more since finishing my “formal training” than I did during it. The courses I took certainly got me started and greatly affected the way I’ve approached my career, but it’s important to realize that your education never ends. Well, maybe it does, but it shouldn’t. Folks progress to the head of our field by shutting their brain down once they’ve got a piece of paper. The really good practitioners, and this is true in any field, continue to train, experiment and challenge themselves throughout their career.

So, what do you do to step up your game?

…and that’s not a rhetorical question. If you’re not new to the site, you probably already know that we always encourage and welcome guest contributions from the community. If you’re interested in adding to this month’s discussion, contact [shaun {at} this website].

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