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Posted by on Oct 1, 2013 | 6 comments

Review: Game Audio Culture by Rob Bridgett

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Review by Karen Collins

Game Audio Culture” isn’t a book, so much as a manifesto. Dragging sound design (perhaps somewhat reluctantly) from out of the darkened underground studios and out into the open, Bridgett proposes that it’s time that sound designers started to be more collaborative with the rest of the game team. Bridgett boldly states that we’re in a “post-sound design era… no longer obsessed with the ‘neglected’ art” of the soundtrack. Sound designers can’t play the victim anymore: sound is getting the respect it deserves, and the next stage is to become a key collaborator on projects. Suggesting that fully one third of the sound designer’s skill set should be social skills, Bridgett sees the audio director as playing a much more important role in the future than in the past. Bridgett dubs this new art “social sound design”.

With that premise in mind, “Game Audio Culture” maps out just how Bridgett envisages the future role of the sound designer to play out. How does game audio influence collaborative practice? Where does design come into the mix, and how does that change under the idea of social sonic practice? How should scheduling change to accommodate a more social, collaborative space? How do you plan your budgets? What role does audio play in QA, and how does audio bring in feedback from its team and its players? These are just some of the questions Bridgett seeks to answer.

For the game sound designer, this book offers practical tips on how to turn your workplace into a more collaborative, holistic world, in which sound plays an important part. It best serves as a how-to guide on being an audio director, in a world where many of the triple-A titles have teams of people working on audio that need to be coordinated and managed. Most game audio directors find themselves in that role through promotion and experience, but without any formal training available. Bridgett fills the gap in knowledge by providing useful tips and tricks that will benefit even the most experienced designers and audio directors. For the rest of us, he gives us much to think about in terms of our practice.

For the academic or scholar studying game audio, the book is particularly useful in its description of process, and will help anyone to understand the many different skills required to undertake sound design for games today. Especially interesting are the more meandering thought pieces that round out the book: self-described “utopian” considerations of where game audio is heading, what the future holds for sound design, and two interviews that read like thoughtful, in-depth discussion between two sound designers, kicking back over a beer and reflecting on their jobs.

Finally, I would suggest that game designers themselves pick up this book, to understand what the sound team is doing and to incorporate some of these tips in bringing the sound team on board early. In short, there’s something in “Game Audio Culture” for everyone: it’s one of those books that is worth reading multiple times, as a reminder of how far we’ve come, and how far we still have to go.

Special thanks to Karen Collins for contributing this review. You can find Karen on gamessound.com

You can purchase Game Audio Culture online here.

6 Comments

  1. Brilliantly written, human, perspective on the constantly evolving culture that has emerged in the games industry and how it has affected sound artists. Providing both a foundation of experience, as well as suggestions for a way forward, Game Audio Culture is a road-map for maximizing the contribution of audio within a game studio. Not content to be “just” another book “about” game audio, Game Audio Culture weaves it’s way through pitfalls of closed doors and invisible walls through the establishment of patterns and subsequent pattern-bashing behaviors.

    Emerge from your soundproof cave!
    Communicate with other creatives!
    Seize sound in the workplace!
    For the future of Game Audio!

      • Emerge from your cave!
        Talk with other creatives!
        The future of Game Audio!

        (tehe)

  2. Would love to read this – wondering if there are plans for a digital copy?

  3. re: digital copy: I do plan on working on / releasing a digital copy, but probably not for a few months.

  4. Just purchased, looking forward to reading!

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