Dynamics…What’s Your Range?

This awesome photo by Jeff Meyer is used under a Creative Commons license. Find more of his photos on flickr...username: soundman1024

This awesome photo, by Jeff Meyer, is used under a Creative Commons license. Find more of his photos on flickr…username: soundman1024

For June, we’ve chosen to focus on the theme of “Dynamics.” As the title of this post implies, we don’t think of this topic as narrow or specific. There are two obvious directions this theme can go.

We could start a discussion about the use of dynamics processing: compressors, limiters, expanders, or transient enhancers. How do we use these in the design phase to mold a sound? How can we use them in the mix to glue together disparate elements?

We can explore the idea of contrast. There is no light without dark. Similarly, there is no loud without soft. What are the implications of this concept in terms of narrative, manipulating the audience, or the simple difference between holding attention or becoming a distraction?

We have some fertile ground to till this month.

Time for our regular addendum. We are always open to guest contributions. If this topic sparks your scrivener impulses…or implores you to stand up on a soap box…you have a willing audience on this site. Contact shaun[at] designingsound [.] org if you’d like to share your thoughts/experience with the community. We’re also planning to cover acoustics next month; a topic for which we will definitely be seeking assistance.

2 Comments on “Dynamics…What’s Your Range?

  1. Pingback: Dynamics…What’s Your Range? | Uber Patrol - The Definitive Cool Guide

  2. When ever I am doing any kind of sound design I always have to remind myself of the type of project I’m working on. Sometimes I forget there will be dialog or I’ll have to layer music over everything and maybe metal scrape sound doesn’t need to be the main focus. But I’m always able to reel myself back in and turn it down a little.

    As for the dynamic range I did a car crash scene at my internship today and a few seconds before the crash I made it almost silent with some slight gusts of wind and them BAM! It’s a very powerful technique.

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