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Posted by on Jun 27, 2012 | 2 comments

A Sound Life – Oriol Tarragó

Sound sparks your imagination, carries emotions, and takes you back to that special moment or to a place where you have not been before. Movies such as Blade RunnerStar WarsApocalypse Now or Grand Prix have used it masterly to create magic atmospheres that become critical to communicate the story. Iker Gil interviews Oriol Tarragó, sound designer for over 30 movies, about his working method, movie genres, his favorite movies, and what cities communicate through sound.

Full Interview

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Posted by on Jun 27, 2012 | 1 comment

The Sound of “Brave”

In this exclusive SoundWorks Collection sound profile we talk with Director Mark Andrews, Re-recording Mixer and Sound Designer Gary Rydstrom, Supervising Sound Editor Gwen Yates Whittle, and Sound Designer E.J. Holowicki.

Since ancient times, stories of epic battles and mystical legends have been passed through the generations across the rugged and mysterious Highlands of Scotland. In “Brave,” a new tale joins the lore when the courageous Merida (voice of Kelly Macdonald) confronts tradition, destiny and the fiercest of beasts.

Directed by Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman, and produced by Katherine Sarafian, “Brave” is a grand adventure full of heart, memorable characters and the signature Pixar humor enjoyed by audiences of all ages. The film’s voice cast features Kelly Macdonald, Julie Walters, Billy Connolly, Emma Thompson, Kevin McKidd, Craig Ferguson, Robbie Coltrane and John Ratzenberger.

To make the most complex visuals possible, Pixar completely rewrote their animation system for the first time in 25 years. Brave is also the first movie ever to use the Dolby Atmos sound format.

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Posted by on Jun 26, 2012 | 2 comments

School of Video Game Audio Now Open

The first online school for learning how to create professional audio for video games has just announced that it is accepting applications for its first course from July to August 2012.

The application deadline of Friday June 29, 2012 is rapidly approaching and is limited to ten students, so make sure to have a look at the details on their application page at: http://School.VideoGameAudio.com/apply
The Course:
- Learn how to make a professional demo reel in Audiokinetic’s Wwise and become more employable in the industry
- Work at your own pace through the course material with assistance from the instructor, Leonard J. Paul
- Course consists of videos, reading assignments, mini-projects and short tests that can be done at your own pace
- Suited for anyone with a strong audio background wishing to expand their knowledge and skills in the game audio industry
Cost:
- 8 weeks of instructional materials at 10+ hours per week for $225 CAD which includes the $25 application fee
- No additional costs to purchase required books or other materials
- One top project from each class will chosen to receive 50% off the cost of the course and will be featured on the site
Quote:
“It’s the first really solid and accessible game audio learning solution to be available worldwide, which will help any and everyone who wish to express themselves through this discipline.” – Francisco, student involved in the beta of the course

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Posted by on Jun 26, 2012 | 3 comments

Joining Team Audio

Volition Sound Designer Ariel Gross has posted a blog on AltDevBlogADay on the process of getting hired for a game audio position.

The blog contains some fascinating insights on the hiring agents perspective , and is a valuable read for those trying to break into the industry, check out the except below;

We kept a central person to review all incoming applicants. That would be me. I’d scrap a bunch of incoming applicants because I could tell by reading the cover letter and resume that a person did not have the stuff. I will talk more about that later. If someone piqued my interest, I would pass their cover letter, resume, and demo materials along to the rest of the audio team. I’d get feedback and then decide if we wanted to proceed with the candidate to the next step.

The next step would be some kind of test. Previously, we had sent out a written test that had a bunch of questions on it. Stuff like, what do you consider to be the three most important areas of sounds in an open world game? What do you think would be difficult about working on audio in an open world game? And if you had to design a beam weapon, how would you put it together both creatively and technically? And a bunch of other riddles and puzzles and noodle-ticklers that usually had no specific correct answer but plenty of potential incorrect or awkward answers.

Read the full post over on AltDevBlogADay.com

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