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Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 8

Posted by on Jun 27, 2016 | 0 comments

Several boom mics extend from all sides of a complex tripod to record 360 degree audio in a field. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: TONSTURM

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this eighth installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from TONSTURM, Sonicsalute.com, Field Recording Working Group, and Monte Sound. Stay tuned for our final collection of stories from our community later this week.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

TONSTURM @TONSTURM: Our company is TONSTURM, and we are two sound designers who run the company: Tilman Hahn and Emil Klotzsch.

Sonicsalute.com @SonicSalute: I am Mikkel Nielsen from Sonicsalute.com

Field Recording Working Group: The Field Recording Working Group is Katsy Pline, Danny Lewis, Daniel Shubat, and whomever else who would like to join us in our practice.

Monte Sound: My name is Ana Monte, founder and sound designer at www.montesound.com, occasionally collaborating with SoundBits. (more…)

Sunday Sound Thought 26 – The Establishing Field

Posted by on Jun 26, 2016 | 0 comments

As the year continues, many of these posts will be philosophical in nature. Some will be in contradiction to previous postings. These are not intended as truths or assertions, they’re merely thoughts…ideas. Think of this as stream of consciousness over a wide span…

This week, I’m returning to the little thread of visual analogs that I had going for a while.

I recently finished reading William Whittington’s Sound Design and Science Fiction, and he had an interesting idea that hadn’t occurred to me before. Background sounds…ambience, the sounds of the space…are sound’s “establishing shot.” The visual establishing shot is a moment of wide perspective. It lets us see the space, what occupies it, and where the characters fit within that space. The blocking and positioning can immediately give us a number of clues as to what’s happening both physically and emotionally in the scene. It’s important to note that the establishing shot doesn’t always happen at the beginning of the scene though.

The background sounds we put into a scene become something similar, an establishing field, and we can do interesting things with that. They let us know what’s taking place outside of the frame, and help us establish the space and the actions taking place within it. This establishing field can precede an establishing shot…picture a close up shot, with the sounds of the environment, while the camera slowly pulls back to reveal the space. That type of combination can create tension. The establishing field can replace the establishing shot entirely, never allowing the viewer to see the larger picture. That can be an excellent way to lock the viewer into a character’s perspective. The polar opposite, which can have the same effect, is to completely deny the viewer of the establishing field. We can transition from an establishing field to a tighter focus on particular sound elements…which has its own implications based on the context.

Just remember that there’s a whole host of narrative effects that can be engendered exclusively through the use of background sounds. How you think about those elements will have an enormous impact on how effectively you use them.

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 7

Posted by on Jun 24, 2016 | 0 comments

Photo: A man shows two other men how to operate a digital recorder and boom mic in Vietnam. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: Avosound

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this seventh installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from Pro Sound Effects, Mindful Audio, BLINKSONIC° and Collected Transients. Stay tuned for more stories from our community next week.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

Pro Sound Effects @prosoundeffects: My name is David Forshee. I’m the Library Specialist at Pro Sound Effects. Other key members of Team PSE include Douglas Price (Founder and President), Jeremy Siegel (Licensing Manager), and Andrew Emge (Operations Specialist).

Mindful Audio @theGeorgeVlad: I’m George Vlad, and I do audio for games and field recording.

BLINKSONIC° @blinksonic: I am Sylvain Stoppani (aka Ambor Grieko), founder of Blinksonic and the only member. With this project I create virtual instruments and sound banks for NI Reaktor.

Collected Transients @coltransients @stosh_t: My name is Stosh Tuszynski. Collected Transients consists of me and my microphones ;) (more…)

Become a Designing Sound Correspondent

Posted by on Jun 23, 2016 | 1 comment

Photo by flickr user Radly J Phoenix; used under a Creative Commons License. Click image to visit source.

Photo by flickr user Radly J Phoenix; used under a Creative Commons License. Click image to visit source.

Back in April, we put out an open call for new contributing editors. Holy crap, were we overwhelmed by the response! Over 50 people stepped forward and threw their names into the hat. Going through all of that data wasn’t easy, and we didn’t have the opportunity to sit down and speak directly with all of you. We’ve selected our new “staff” and are busy getting them up to speed, but we don’t want the fact that you may not have been selected to discourage you from participating. So, we’re creating a new role here on Designing Sound to get the rest of you involved: the Correspondent! (more…)

News: Heavy Adds Support For Dynamic Plugins In Wwise 2016

Posted by on Jun 22, 2016 | 1 comment

 

Heavy by Enzien Audio is a framework for easily generating audio plugins for use in interactive sound and music applications such as games, instruments or installations. It makes use of Pure Data as a front end and generates a wide range of Plugin formats from Pure Data patches, including Unity3D, VST, Wwise, C and Javascript.

The project recently announced that Heavy now supports dynamic plugins for Wwise 2016 and subsequently discontinues support for earlier Wwise versions. Dynamic plugins don’t require re-compiling the Wwise library anymore which will enhance the workflow of designers significantly. Alongside these improvements the online documentation received facelift.

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 6

Posted by on Jun 22, 2016 | 0 comments

A mic with a thick wind muff faces the propeller of a private jet.

Photo: Frank ‘The Recordist’ Bry

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this sixth installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from The Recordist, contortDistort, Sound Ex Machina, Pablo Valverde, and Avosound. Stay tuned for more stories from our community later this week and next week.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

The Recordist @the_recordist: My name is Frank Bry and I own and operate The Recordist.

contortDistort @contortDistort: Christian Kjeldsen, and I’m currently a solo operation.

Sound Ex Machina @soundexmachina: Hello there, thanks for having us! My name is Kostas Loukovikas and my co-creators are John Varelidis and Nick Zlatko.

Pablo Valverde @Valvertronix: My name is Pablo Valverde and I work alone, unless I need someone else.

Avosound @avosoundsfx: Guido Helbling.

When was a time you felt you pushed the boundaries to capture the perfect sound effect?

The Recordist: Back in 2009 I had a tendency to record in dangerous locations or perform risky actions to record sound effects. Whether it was crawling around a steep rock quarry cliff with a boom pole and a microphone, recording close up gigantic fire bursts, or setting off explosives, I tried to capture the “unique character” of the moment. I have since mellowed with my older age, but I still strive for that “once in a lifetime” sound event. I record lots of thunder and lightning and found that it’s hit and miss most of the time, but I have devised ways to effectively capture the wide dynamic range of thunderstorms. I had to build devices and create special locations to keep the recording gear safe while still capturing the raw power of thunder effectively.

Also, back then the Sennheiser 8000 series microphones were not widely used for recording sound effects. After a good friend sent me some sound effects he had recorded with the microphone, I was hooked. I was one of the very first vendors to release sounds using those microphones, and since then they have really caught on. Some wonderful material has been released by many people using this setup. (more…)

Introducing Designing Sound Exchange!

Posted by on Jun 21, 2016 | 4 comments

DSE_Home

We’ve got a brand new feature on the site today! We’ve added a discussion area…

Welcome to Designing Sound Exchange!

We’re calling it a discussion area and not a forum, because it’s not really set up like a forum. Many long time readers may remember a site called Social Sound Design, and we’ve modeled DSE after it. If you remember how that site was, before it merged with Stack Exchange, skip this next paragraph. (more…)

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 5

Posted by on Jun 20, 2016 | 2 comments

A digital recorder is suspended off the ground in a makeshift bamboo tripod. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: Sebastian, Sonocaine http://www.sonocaine.com/blog/2015/6/16/robinson-crusoe-style-boom-wind-shield

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this fifth installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from Sonocaine, Foley Collection, Daan Hendricks and The Sound Pack Tree. Stay tuned for more stories from our community later this week and next week.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

Sonocaine @sonocaine: Hi, my Name is Sebastian Morsch and I run Sonocaine.

Foley Collection @foleycollection / Surround Sound LAB: My name is Alvaro de Iscar, founder and main sound designer of Foleycollection.com and Surroundsoundlab.net.

Daan Hendriks @AudioDaan: Daan Hendriks

The Sound Pack Tree @SoundPackTree: My name is Heiko Lohmann, and I work at the Hidden Track Studio in Cologne, Germany.

When was a time you felt you pushed the boundaries to capture the perfect sound effect?

Sonocaine: I’ve carried a lot of equipment to many places and record under different and sometimes hard conditions, but I’m not sure if that actually qualifies as “pushing the boundaries”. I’m not saying that doing these things to capture beautiful sounds is not a great and valuable effort, but if I am just working hard, I’m probably well inside those boundaries. When I recorded my last library ‘Quad City Berlin’, I carried five mic stands, five windshields and a 788 in a backpack around town on a bicycle (I really badly wanted spaced omni quad plus MS). It was physically challenging but I didn’t really push boundaries with doing so. It was just hard work. There are much greater stories in sound recording (i.e. clever worldizing setups, etc.) that constitute pushing boundaries, because they were actually thought up outside the box. (more…)

Sunday Sound Thought 25 – When Less Is Not More

Posted by on Jun 19, 2016 | 0 comments

As the year continues, many of these posts will be philosophical in nature. Some will be in contradiction to previous postings. These are not intended as truths or assertions, they’re merely thoughts…ideas. Think of this as stream of consciousness over a wide span…

I went to see a period war film last night, and something stuck out to me. Well a lot of things stuck out to me, but one thing in particular really pulled my attention. [ed. This was an indie film from outside the U.S., so stop looking at listings trying to guess which one… ;)] There was a scene where the film took the classic approach of slow everything down ever so slightly, strip almost all of the sounds, and alternate between a montage of violence and the protagonist looking shell-shocked. It’s something we’ve seen many times in many films, and it’s become a form of cinematic short hand to put the viewer within a character’s perspective. There’s also an assumption that, I think, comes along with the adoption of this approach: that it’s going to work.

In this case, it did not.

When used properly, the concept of less is more can be a powerful story-telling philosophy. It has to work in the context though, and less is more certainly doesn’t mean strip absolutely everything out. This particular scene did just that, everything was gone except for the oh-so-favorite shell-shock sound of tinnitus. The scene lost all its pacing, it dragged and felt way too long…despite the variance in pacing of the visual edit. There was something about the combination of context, use and duration of the treatment that just pulled me out of the story and made me wonder, “How long is this going to last?” The thing that hit me, as I sat there waiting for the film to get on with the story, was that sound could have fixed the pacing in this moment…it could have given the sequence an emotional trajectory. It just actually, for a change, needed more sounds to do it.

…not many mind you; a handful would have gone a long way…but that’s still more.

Pushing the Boundary – Your Stories: SFX Creators, Part 4

Posted by on Jun 17, 2016 | 0 comments

Trees wind into the fog set high into the atmosphere. Article edited by Adriane Kuzminski.

Photo: The Nature Sounds Society Japan – https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturesoundsjp/5823704520/in/photostream/

If you are a sound effects or synth creator who has submitted a library to the Designing Sound monthly recaps and you would like to contribute to this series (and for some you haven’t received the questionnaire—check your spam folder), please email adriane@designingsound.org.

 

In this fourth installment about how SFX creators have pushed artistic and professional boundaries, we hear from Detunized, BOOM Library, and Lilesoundlibrary. Stay tuned for more stories from our community through the next couple weeks.

What is your name, and who are your team members/co-creators?

Detunized @detunized: Hello community! My name is Stephan Marche. In 2009 I founded Detunized where I develop and distribute themed sound libraries and live packs for the Ableton DAW, as well as universally formatted instrument banks. My current catalog offers about 80 releases. I don’t have employees or freelance supporters, so Detunized is a mere one-man business. Nevertheless I couldn’t run Detunized without the help of some alter egos. (Maybe it is funny to get to know the “team” ;-) )

BOOM Library @BOOMlibrary: My name is Axel Rohrbach from BOOM Library. My team members are Michael Schwendler, David Philipp and Patrice Börding.

Lilesoundlibrary @Lilesound: Hi, we are Carl and Francesco, co-founders of Lilesoundlibrary, an independent audio studio. In the beginning we dealt only with sound design and music for animated films and short movies. We realized that more and more we had to create and synchronize our own sounds to get the “perfect match” for our projects. So why not embark on the creation of libraries? It really is something we value with lots of fun and learning throughout the creative process. (more…)