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AudioGaming competition — results!

Posted by on Jul 28, 2014 | 0 comments

5year anniversary

The results are in! Thanks for taking part in the competition, I’m told the AudioGaming crew were quite overwhelmed by all the responses they received. Here’s what Amaury said:

Some quotes were just too funny so we decided to award two prizes. One for the best serious quote, one for the funniest. The two winners will get full post-production bundles.

(..drum roll..)

Serious quote:

Winner: Kevin Peters. Sculpt, control, create.

Runner up quotes: Everything indoors, The science of sounds, The future of sound design today

Funniest quote:

Winner: Andrea Proietti. Presets are for losers

Runner up quote: Unleash an audio storm like a Greek god of sound.

Congratulations Kevin and Andrea!

The Tonebenders – Vehicle Recording Roundtable

Posted by on Jul 25, 2014 | 0 comments

I’m really stoked by the way The Tonebenders Podcast has been jumping onto our monthly topics when they can. This time, they’ve got a spectacular roundtable conversation with Rob Noke, Watson Wu and Max Lachmann. Give it a listen, and make sure to visit the Tonebenders webpage to find out more information about their guests in this episode.

Thanks for the contribution, guys!

Planes, Trains and Automobiles …and tanks and bikes and boats and…

Posted by on Jul 17, 2014 | 3 comments

centurian_tank

Guest Contribution by Stephan Schütze

Why I am not going to tell you which microphone to use

The simple answer to this statement is, because we don’t have time. The exact choice of which microphone to use for each situation of recording a vehicle is a detailed exercise and would take more pages than we have space for. Even then, there is a major flaw associated with the idea. What I hear and what sounds good to my ears may not work for you. Suggesting Brand X or a Model 2B, stuffed up the exhaust pipe of your Honda, may only serve to encourage you to spend more money than you need to. As much as we all love to buy new equipment, I think there is value in stepping beyond the tools and toys. I’m going to be more general and share a more conceptual approach to capturing good vehicle sounds.

What I will do is take you through some of the essential lessons I’ve learned when recording vehicle sounds for Sound Librarian. In creating our sound libraries, I’ve recorded motorbikes, cars, tanks, boats, airplanes, pretty much every vehicle I could get my microphones near.

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New Theme!

Posted by on Jul 14, 2014 | 1 comment

image by: Nicolas Raymond

image by: Nicolas Raymond

We have a new theme up!  As many of our readers know; the old theme has been troublesome for quiet some time. And we got fed up with it’s unreliability and lack of support. We do apologize for any inconvenience incurred by that awful collection of CSS and tears.

We would like to thank everyone for their patience as we continue to tweak this new look and feel. Any weirdness you encounter please be sure to let us know!  We’d like to thank our own Varun Nair for his hard work in making this new (and way better) theme usable.

We’ll be making more fixes and changes over the coming weeks to make it more readable on mobile devices.

Spectral Analysis: Interview with Rob Blake

Posted by on Jul 11, 2014 | 1 comment

image001
Many thanks to Brad Dyck for contributing this interview. You can follow Brad on Twitter @Brad_Dyck

It was my pleasure to speak with Rob Blake, Audio Director best known for his work on the Mass Effect trilogy. Plants vs Zombies: Garden Warfare is available now for PC and will be available for PS3/PS4 on August 19th.

BD: What originally made you move away from the UK to come over to Canada?

RB: Actually, before I came to Canada I was working at a small start-up in Spain (Tragnarion Studios). It was a really fascinating place to work because they were really passionate gamers who just wanted to make something they wanted to play themselves.

After I’d been with them for nearly a year I got offered the lead position on Mass Effect. I just finished the project I was working on in Spain so the timing worked out well. It was a dream job for me at the time – I’d been an Audio Lead before in the UK but working on something like Mass Effect was very special.

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… Mr. President!!! … (Gen 3 Helicopter Implementation in Frostbite/Battlefield 4)

Posted by on Jul 10, 2014 | 11 comments

H-DRAGONS_1_web_v99

Guest contribution by Ben Minto and Bence Pajor of DICE

… Mr. President!!! …

There we were in The Thirsty Bear, reflecting on the first lot of GDC Audio Sessions, and up walks Mr. Menhorn. He knew what he wanted from us; so after introductions, a few more IPAs and some passionate discussion it was in the bag.

So here we are. A “behind the scenes”, warts and all, article and video about the helicopter models in Battlefield 4, written for the Designing Sound ‘vehicle’ month, of July.

The original model (design, implementation, samples etc.) and video capture were done by Bence Pajor, the Battlefield Audio Director and I’m (Ben Minto) handling the write up, even though I’m heading up the audio for DICE’s Star Wars Battlefront project.  This is because we were both Audio Directors on Battlefield 4, due to Bence’s absence during the middle of the project, which was in turn due to the birth of his son (mini) Olof and Sweden’s generous paternity leave. (more…)

The Art and Craft of Foley

Posted by on Jul 10, 2014 | 0 comments

screen“Footsteps with character: the art and craft of Foley”, a great essay written by Benjamin Wright, included in the Screen journal.

“In this essay I look more closely at modern Foley performance and aesthetics, giving special attention to the customized nature of Foley effects and the importance of creating sound with ‘character’. What interests me is not only how Foley professionals have negotiated their role as sound artists but how the professional goals of Foley have shifted in response to the increasing use of digital audio workstations.”

Download/read (PDF file) / via musicofsound

A Brief Tour of Automotive Sound Sources

Posted by on Jul 8, 2014 | 1 comment

Image by Late Model Restoration Supply, used under Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Image by Late Model Restoration Supply, used under Creative Commons license. Click image to view source.

Guest Contribution by Michael Hermes

Modern cars are boring. They’re safe, practical, and quiet to the point of being uninteresting. A passing sedan glides by with a gentle whoosh of air passing over the car and the tires on the pavement. It makes for a pleasant ride to work but a short article on sound.

Cars didn’t start out quiet, though. Decades of engineering and research have identified the potential noise sources on a vehicle and reduced them to almost nothing. The internal combustion engine-powered car has a vast array of potential noise sources, all of which are quantified and treated by Noise, Vibration, and Harshness (NVH) engineers.

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All those things that get us around…

Posted by on Jul 3, 2014 | 0 comments

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I held off on the announce post for a few days, because we had a few articles that spilled over from last month’s theme. Now that we’re caught up, it’s time to dive into this month’s theme…Vehicles!

Do we really need more of an introduction than that? My guess is no. And sure, there’s a rail car at a drag race in the image above, but we’re not single-minded. There are boats, planes, jets, motorcycles, bicycles, and more that all fall into this category. We’re lining up some fun articles, but don’t hesitate to bring your experience to the table as well.

Guest contributions are always welcomed and encouraged here on Designing Sound. If you’d like to contribute to this month’s theme, or have an off-topic post you’d like to put in front of the community, make sure you contact us through site’s contact form or e-mail shaun at [this site]. If you’re the kind of person who likes to plan ahead, next month’s theme will be Listening.

Silence At Work

Posted by on Jul 2, 2014 | 0 comments

For the past few years I have been bothered about the amount of time I spend on a job — not specifically about how busy I am, but rather how much time I spend concentrating on the task that needs getting done. By default, most of us learn to constantly optimise our workflows as our experience grows. This is very important, as successful projects are judged not only on their quality but also budgets! But most of us also have the task of being creative collaborators while working long hours. Not easy.

One of the biggest problems I find with workflow optimisation is that I get stuck with techniques and ideas that have previously worked and quite often end up forcing ideas that don’t fit the context. They are often sub-conscious decisions and I need to consciously stop myself and try something new. I recently started taking ‘silent breaks’ to combat this. I’m a big fan of the pomodoro technique and use a 25 minute timer when I work. With every break (every 25 minutes) I step away from the computer and silently ponder on my work. I was surprised (and in hindsight, not so surprised) to find that it greatly improved my productivity and the quality of my work. There is something quite stimulating in taking a break, staring out of the window in silence and letting the mind wander.

But there are days when I ignore the timer because I’m too busy trying to make an idea work. I then start to optimise my workflow once again and forget about productive silences. An infinite loop.